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Anne Adams Today...we are taking it slow. Not listening to the news...I am living in my own world. Savoring the last couple days of precious time away from everything familiar. In total awe at the way my life works. And beyond blessed to have so many Angels ar Read more ... ound me. We are moving further south...the fire of the first day of Autumn starts to hide a bit more...and I am once again left breathless by the beauty around me. The park where my Hubby went sledding as a kid. The canopy of teals..lime..and crayola crayon green so shades the paths...you can barely see a foot ahead of you! I fed quick stripped chipmunks that dated at warp speed to steal the biggest chucks of breadcrust! Cheeks popped out so wide...adorable! And they looked like they were having as much fun as I was. We rolled by the schools..houses..party spots. So interesting to watch my husband recall those things that are embedded so deeply in him. His eyes are never as blue as they are here. We went to Hamburg beach...where he learned to swim. The same place he..and his buds submerged a vehicle when the frozen ice crackled beneath them! So many stories! We toured the rusting dinosaurs of the abandoned steel plants that loom over the waterfront like some ancient city suddenly vacated by an awful event. And right across the street...muddy row houses still very alive with tricycles.. and trampolines..and faded plastic toys sprinkled about the yard. The love of family...no matter where. When we made our way out of the township... I was given a reminded that we are never alone. Met a darling young lady while chirping in predictable fashion with anyone that would listen at the Checkout. Lol. A stunning woman looked at me, and shared she was, in fact, from Dunnellon! She never budged as I flew around the corner and almost lifted he'd off the floor giving her a big, fuzzy, biker chickie hug!! Now...here's the wild part. She popped in on FB. She is actually married to the nephew of some of my husbands peeps!! I almost fell over! Small world... Oh hell yeah! Still can't believe that one. One of the coolest experiences ever!!!! We ended up back at the lake for a sunset dinner at our regular spot...Hoak's . The best roast beef on Weck in the world. Afterwards we waddled to the car (sheltered from the windy 45°). and watched the longest sunset ever. The flame kissed orb was so bright through the strands of purple and peach clouds it left trails in our vision! The oranges so vivid..it actually appeared to become liquid solder as it slinked below lake level! Wonderful end to a wonderful day. So....this morning , those are the thoughts I will be taking with me as I move further south. Hopefully.. I can catch up with The Queen of Leon today...and have our last night up here before reality sets. Gotta fly...just so happens my man booked us a room next door to a coffee roaster. He is a quick study... Lol. Make it an awesome day..hug your family. Xox
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Australian HEMP Party Is that Sour Diesel in your bong the real thing? Portland scientist sets out to map marijuana DNA and find out September 22, 2014 Before Lemon Haze and Super Skunk, it was mostly just good and bad weed. But walk into any place that sells medical o Read more ... r recreational pot today and customers face a staggering variety of marijuana strains -- each with its own funky name, its own smell, appearance and the high it promises to deliver. These modern strains, some of them highly sought after, are the product of a generally secretive, outlaw marijuana culture, where few records are kept and word of mouth rules. But how do you know the gram of Lemon Haze in your vaporizer is actually what it’s supposed to be? A Portland scientist is trying to solve that fundamental question of the cannabis world. Nine months ago, Mowgli Holmes, 42, started Phylos Bioscience in Southwest Portland with entrepreneur Nishan Karassik, 44, with the aim of using cannabis DNA to untangle the genetic makeup of as many marijuana strains as they can find. Their ultimate goals: to certify marijuana strains so consumers know what they’re getting and to provide pot growers with a kind of “stud book” of strain genetics to help guide their breeding. “There is no reassurance that if you’re a Sour Diesel fan, that you could go into a dispensary and get Sour Diesel,” said Holmes, a microbiologist. “It’ll say Sour Diesel, but it will be something totally random.” Their work is the latest example of scientists getting into the business of pot. So far they've focused mostly on lab testing for things such as potency and pesticides -- a requirement in places like Colorado and Washington, the only two states with legal recreational marijuana programs, and Oregon, one of 23 states that allow medical marijuana use. An initiative on Oregon's November ballot also would legalize the drug here. In California, lab testing isn’t required, but consumer demand for lab-tested pot has spawned an industry. Scientists, too, have gotten involved in helping marijuana companies fine-tune extraction methods to meet the growing market for potent cannabis concentrates. But cannabis genetics remains a largely untapped field, said Taylor West, deputy director of the National Cannabis Industry Association. She said marijuana genetics overlaps with intellectual property and U.S. patent issues, areas complicated by the federal prohibition on the drug. “It’s a very controversial topic,” West said. “We haven’t seen a lot of our businesses talking about that particular area of science.” The way Holmes sees it, identifying a strain’s particular genetic makeup is a major step toward being able to assure strain-fixated marijuana consumers that what they’re smoking is what they were told it was. Genetics, too, can help growers breed with more precision. “Our biggest project really is to solve the question of consistency in this industry,” Holmes said. Strain confusion There is some reason to the rhyme of how strains are named now – for instance, names that include lemon generally have a citrus scent and diesel strains have a petrol odor – but often that’s where the similarity ends. Marijuana aficionados, Holmes said, are as preoccupied with the differences among strains as wine critics are about grape varietals. Imagine, for instance, walking into a wine shop and asking for a Malbec only to be handed a Merlot. Erin Wallace, a medical marijuana grower in Gladstone, can relate. She recently bought a seedling marijuana plant labeled as Maui Bubble Gift from a dispensary, thinking she was getting a strain known for being lower in THC and higher in cannabidiol, or CBD. Many patients say CBD has a more therapeutic effect than THC. After harvest, Wallace had the flowers tested at a lab only to discover that the strain had a higher THC than she expected. “From a grower’s perspective, it’s just impossible to verify that you have gotten what they say you have gotten,” said Wallace. Janice Patten, an Oregon medical marijuana patient who uses the drug to treat migraines, said it’s common to pick up an inaccurately labeled strain. “Until a patient gets a hold of it, no one really knows,” the Beaverton woman said. “It’s like getting a prescription from the doctor and having a bad reaction to it.” Some longtime marijuana growers say they welcome more transparency and clarity when it comes to strain genetics, but described Holmes’ mission as a daunting one. First, there’s the question of how Phylos Bioscience will keep up with new strains that enter the market. Then there’s the tricky issue of figuring out which strain is the real Lemon Haze or OG Kush? “Do you take it to the original breeder?” said Dru West, a medical marijuana grower in Bend and author of “The Secrets of the West Coast Masters,” a guide to growing pot. “It sounds good to say you can do that, but a lot of that is myth and fable. A lot of that stuff exists in chat rooms. There will be a lot of convoluted information.” Holmes agrees. He’s considered crowd sourcing the matter and letting consumers pick the real Lemon Haze based on its appearance, smell and high. He’s thought about hiring “non-stoner grad students” to conduct historical research into whatever records may exist to find the earliest mention of Lemon Haze. Maybe a panel of pot experts should make the ultimate call. Holmes said some California lawyers are planning to start a strain registry, a step that might resolve the question. “This part of it,” Holmes acknowledged, “is a bloody mess.” Mapping pot Until last year, Holmes used his Ivy League Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology to research HIV, work that over time, he said, started to feel increasingly hopeless, like a problem that science might not ultimately solve. He returned home to Oregon, eager to dig into another, more promising, area of research. Seeing that marijuana had become a burgeoning industry, Holmes did what scientists do: He started asking questions. “Immediately I looked around and said, wait, no one is doing a genetics study of cannabis?” Holmes said. “No one is doing an evolutionary map of cannabis?” (Asked about their own experience with cannabis, Holmes and Karassik are circumspect. “We are not stoners,” said Holmes, after careful consideration, “but we believe strongly in all forms of research.”) He’s teamed up with his former professor at Columbia University, Robert DeSalle, an evolutionary biologist, to help create the map using marijuana DNA. DeSalle, a curator at the Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, will ultimately create what is, in essence, a family tree of pot. The tree starts with “landrace” strains, the plant’s original forebears, and ends in the messy jumble of modern-day strains like Girl Scout Cookies and Orange Kush. “It’s a really good biological problem despite it being cannabis,” DeSalle said. “If someone had come to me and said these are watermelon, I would have jumped on this project in a second. It’s a perfect modern day tour de force that technology can figure out.” In addition to the genetic mapping, Holmes’ company uses DNA sequencing to help cannabis growers quickly determine the sex of seedlings so they can cull male plants. Unpollinated female plants produce far more THC, the psychoactive component that gives marijuana users a high. Holmes and his colleagues also use genetic material to screen plants for microbial contamination, such E. coli, salmonella and mold. Oregon requires medical marijuana sold in dispensaries be tested for potency, some pesticides and mold and mildew. None of the scientists at Phylos Bioscience handle marijuana; droplets of plant DNA arrive in the mail from eight labs across five states that perform cannabis testing. The labs extract DNA samples and ship them to Holmes’ lab. So far, they’ve collected hundreds of samples, including a 2,700-year-old pot stash found in a Gobi desert grave. Growers and consumers can take cannabis to one of the testing labs Holmes’ works with to have it added to the project. He's especially interested in older, oddball samples. “People can get DNA from frozen wooly mammoth legs,” said Holmes. “We can get DNA from roaches in your guitar case from 1975.” For scientists like Holmes, the field of cannabis research offers a new frontier. “Scientists are always searching for something that hasn’t been looked at and in crowded fields it’s hard to find a project that hasn’t been done,” he said. “People have explored every little corner of the biological world.” Holmes has already dreamed up a dozen research projects on pot. “It’s wide open,” he said. “There is so much fun stuff to look at.” -- Noelle Crombie http://www.oregonlive.com/marijuana/index.ssf/2014/09/marijuana_in_oregon_portland_s.html
Is that Sour Diesel in your bong the real thing? Portland scientist sets out to map marijuana...
www.oregonlive.com
How do you know the gram of Lemon Haze in your vaporizer is actually what it's supposed to be? A Portland scientist is trying to solve that fundamental question of the cannabis world.
Now
HEMP Queensland Is that Sour Diesel in your bong the real thing? Portland scientist sets out to map marijuana DNA and find out September 22, 2014 Before Lemon Haze and Super Skunk, it was mostly just good and bad weed. But walk into any place that sells medical o Read more ... r recreational pot today and customers face a staggering variety of marijuana strains -- each with its own funky name, its own smell, appearance and the high it promises to deliver. These modern strains, some of them highly sought after, are the product of a generally secretive, outlaw marijuana culture, where few records are kept and word of mouth rules. But how do you know the gram of Lemon Haze in your vaporizer is actually what it’s supposed to be? A Portland scientist is trying to solve that fundamental question of the cannabis world. Nine months ago, Mowgli Holmes, 42, started Phylos Bioscience in Southwest Portland with entrepreneur Nishan Karassik, 44, with the aim of using cannabis DNA to untangle the genetic makeup of as many marijuana strains as they can find. Their ultimate goals: to certify marijuana strains so consumers know what they’re getting and to provide pot growers with a kind of “stud book” of strain genetics to help guide their breeding. “There is no reassurance that if you’re a Sour Diesel fan, that you could go into a dispensary and get Sour Diesel,” said Holmes, a microbiologist. “It’ll say Sour Diesel, but it will be something totally random.” Their work is the latest example of scientists getting into the business of pot. So far they've focused mostly on lab testing for things such as potency and pesticides -- a requirement in places like Colorado and Washington, the only two states with legal recreational marijuana programs, and Oregon, one of 23 states that allow medical marijuana use. An initiative on Oregon's November ballot also would legalize the drug here. In California, lab testing isn’t required, but consumer demand for lab-tested pot has spawned an industry. Scientists, too, have gotten involved in helping marijuana companies fine-tune extraction methods to meet the growing market for potent cannabis concentrates. But cannabis genetics remains a largely untapped field, said Taylor West, deputy director of the National Cannabis Industry Association. She said marijuana genetics overlaps with intellectual property and U.S. patent issues, areas complicated by the federal prohibition on the drug. “It’s a very controversial topic,” West said. “We haven’t seen a lot of our businesses talking about that particular area of science.” The way Holmes sees it, identifying a strain’s particular genetic makeup is a major step toward being able to assure strain-fixated marijuana consumers that what they’re smoking is what they were told it was. Genetics, too, can help growers breed with more precision. “Our biggest project really is to solve the question of consistency in this industry,” Holmes said. Strain confusion There is some reason to the rhyme of how strains are named now – for instance, names that include lemon generally have a citrus scent and diesel strains have a petrol odor – but often that’s where the similarity ends. Marijuana aficionados, Holmes said, are as preoccupied with the differences among strains as wine critics are about grape varietals. Imagine, for instance, walking into a wine shop and asking for a Malbec only to be handed a Merlot. Erin Wallace, a medical marijuana grower in Gladstone, can relate. She recently bought a seedling marijuana plant labeled as Maui Bubble Gift from a dispensary, thinking she was getting a strain known for being lower in THC and higher in cannabidiol, or CBD. Many patients say CBD has a more therapeutic effect than THC. After harvest, Wallace had the flowers tested at a lab only to discover that the strain had a higher THC than she expected. “From a grower’s perspective, it’s just impossible to verify that you have gotten what they say you have gotten,” said Wallace. Janice Patten, an Oregon medical marijuana patient who uses the drug to treat migraines, said it’s common to pick up an inaccurately labeled strain. “Until a patient gets a hold of it, no one really knows,” the Beaverton woman said. “It’s like getting a prescription from the doctor and having a bad reaction to it.” Some longtime marijuana growers say they welcome more transparency and clarity when it comes to strain genetics, but described Holmes’ mission as a daunting one. First, there’s the question of how Phylos Bioscience will keep up with new strains that enter the market. Then there’s the tricky issue of figuring out which strain is the real Lemon Haze or OG Kush? “Do you take it to the original breeder?” said Dru West, a medical marijuana grower in Bend and author of “The Secrets of the West Coast Masters,” a guide to growing pot. “It sounds good to say you can do that, but a lot of that is myth and fable. A lot of that stuff exists in chat rooms. There will be a lot of convoluted information.” Holmes agrees. He’s considered crowd sourcing the matter and letting consumers pick the real Lemon Haze based on its appearance, smell and high. He’s thought about hiring “non-stoner grad students” to conduct historical research into whatever records may exist to find the earliest mention of Lemon Haze. Maybe a panel of pot experts should make the ultimate call. Holmes said some California lawyers are planning to start a strain registry, a step that might resolve the question. “This part of it,” Holmes acknowledged, “is a bloody mess.” Mapping pot Until last year, Holmes used his Ivy League Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology to research HIV, work that over time, he said, started to feel increasingly hopeless, like a problem that science might not ultimately solve. He returned home to Oregon, eager to dig into another, more promising, area of research. Seeing that marijuana had become a burgeoning industry, Holmes did what scientists do: He started asking questions. “Immediately I looked around and said, wait, no one is doing a genetics study of cannabis?” Holmes said. “No one is doing an evolutionary map of cannabis?” (Asked about their own experience with cannabis, Holmes and Karassik are circumspect. “We are not stoners,” said Holmes, after careful consideration, “but we believe strongly in all forms of research.”) He’s teamed up with his former professor at Columbia University, Robert DeSalle, an evolutionary biologist, to help create the map using marijuana DNA. DeSalle, a curator at the Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, will ultimately create what is, in essence, a family tree of pot. The tree starts with “landrace” strains, the plant’s original forebears, and ends in the messy jumble of modern-day strains like Girl Scout Cookies and Orange Kush. “It’s a really good biological problem despite it being cannabis,” DeSalle said. “If someone had come to me and said these are watermelon, I would have jumped on this project in a second. It’s a perfect modern day tour de force that technology can figure out.” In addition to the genetic mapping, Holmes’ company uses DNA sequencing to help cannabis growers quickly determine the sex of seedlings so they can cull male plants. Unpollinated female plants produce far more THC, the psychoactive component that gives marijuana users a high. Holmes and his colleagues also use genetic material to screen plants for microbial contamination, such E. coli, salmonella and mold. Oregon requires medical marijuana sold in dispensaries be tested for potency, some pesticides and mold and mildew. None of the scientists at Phylos Bioscience handle marijuana; droplets of plant DNA arrive in the mail from eight labs across five states that perform cannabis testing. The labs extract DNA samples and ship them to Holmes’ lab. So far, they’ve collected hundreds of samples, including a 2,700-year-old pot stash found in a Gobi desert grave. Growers and consumers can take cannabis to one of the testing labs Holmes’ works with to have it added to the project. He's especially interested in older, oddball samples. “People can get DNA from frozen wooly mammoth legs,” said Holmes. “We can get DNA from roaches in your guitar case from 1975.” For scientists like Holmes, the field of cannabis research offers a new frontier. “Scientists are always searching for something that hasn’t been looked at and in crowded fields it’s hard to find a project that hasn’t been done,” he said. “People have explored every little corner of the biological world.” Holmes has already dreamed up a dozen research projects on pot. “It’s wide open,” he said. “There is so much fun stuff to look at.” -- Noelle Crombie http://www.oregonlive.com/marijuana/index.ssf/2014/09/marijuana_in_oregon_portland_s.html
Is that Sour Diesel in your bong the real thing? Portland scientist sets out to map marijuana...
www.oregonlive.com
How do you know the gram of Lemon Haze in your vaporizer is actually what it's supposed to be? A Portland scientist is trying to solve that fundamental question of the cannabis world.
Now
Ebenezer Akinniyi
Screenwriter Toni Ann Johnson Talks Black Lit and Hollywood
www.ebony.com
Toni Ann Johnson is a writer for both film (Step Up 2: The Streets) and television (Ruby Bridges, The Courage to Love). The native New Yorker has taken a break from her screenwriting duties and authored…
25 minutes ago
Ebenezer Akinniyi 30 July 2014 Entertainment & Culture / Books Screenwriter Toni Ann Johnson Talks Black Lit and Hollywood The screenwriter discusses her debut novel, ‘Remedy for a Broken Angel’ By Gary Harris Related Tags toni ann johnson Screenwriter Ton Read more ... i Ann Johnson Talks Black Lit and Hollywood Author Toni Ann Johnson Toni Ann Johnson is a writer for both film (Step Up 2: The Streets) and television (Ruby Bridges, The Courage to Love). The native New Yorker has taken a break from her screenwriting duties and authored Remedy for a Broken Angel—a rich, compelling debut novel that examines family, loyalty, honesty, sex and mental health. Johnson follows a mother and daughter through painful parallel experiences, with stops in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Bermuda, using jazz, film and photography as the backdrop. Johnson recently spoke by phone in-between stops on her promotional book tour to discuss her thoughts on a wide range of topics, including her stunning page-turner. RELATED: JESSICA CARE MOORE, 'BULLET' PROOF DIVA [NEW BOOK] EBONY: You open the novel in a vividly described, high-end, mental therapy clinic. Your late father was a therapist and a jazz fan. Did that give you a solid basis for researching those aspects of the book? Toni Ann Johnson: It gave me a start. But my father was a psychologist and a psychoanalyst. He studied with Theodor Reik, a protégé of [Sigmund] Freud. The therapist in the novel is a psychiatrist. She prescribes medicine, which my father didn’t. When I was a child, one of my father’s offices was in our home. During college, I lived in my father’s office near NYU. I knew his patients and his colleagues. I was immersed in the world and absorbed it. I’ve also been in therapy myself, several times, and that’s where more specific research took place. My father did enjoy jazz, and all my life he had office apartments in Greenwich Village with proximity to several jazz clubs. The first was on Fifth Ave and 12th Street. Around the corner on University Place was a bar/restaurant called Bradley’s that also had live jazz. He took me there a lot. A few blocks away there was the Knickerbocker Bar and Grill, and close to that The Cookery, where Alberta Hunter performed. EBONY: At its core, the story deals with a mother and a daughter who can’t get along. Are their issues societal or personal? TAJ: I think they’re both. In a broad sense, the pressure for Serena to be a mother is coming out of the time/tradition she and her husband were raised in. But the issues Serena and her daughter have are also unique to them. It’s more complicated than they “can’t get along.” I think there are more opportunities for women of color now than there were a couple of decades ago, I think it’s still, in general, a challenge. I’ve lost interest in the discussion about how hard things are. Serena’s a narcissist and doesn’t recognize her error in putting her own emotional needs before her child’s. She’s been irreparably damaged during her own childhood, and unfortunately that mars her ability to be a loving mother. She hasn’t recovered from her own trauma. I’m not sure it’s fair or accurate to say that Artie can’t get along with her mother. In childhood, she’s just reacting to Serena and trying to survive. When she’s older, she can’t “connect” with Serena, but that’s somewhat different from an inability to get along. She literally and figuratively can’t connect. Her stepmother prevents access, and then when she does see her, communicating is awkward. Later, she’s angry with her mother and wants revenge and, deep down, love, which can’t co-exist successfully. EBONY: What advice do you have for younger women just starting out in their careers, re: conflicts between work and home? And what does your novel have to offer on the topic? TAJ: My characters are flawed and obviously not meant to be role models. The book follows [two of] them trying not to be a mess and trying to clean up their messes. They are artists, and yes, they have domestic issues. That said, this isn’t a novel written with the intention to set an example of how to behave as a working woman/spouse and mother. EBONY: You went to Hollywood in pursuit of an acting career. Despite the most recent success of Kerry Washington and Lupita Nyong’o, there aren’t many roles for women of African descent. From your perspective, how much or little has the town changed in terms of hiring women in front of and behind the camera? And when and why did you decide to become a writer? TAJ: I was always a writer. I came to L.A. from New York in 1992 with a project in hand that I’d written. I began professional training as an actress at 14, a few years before I began writing. But then at age 17, I began NYU and studied writing as well as acting. I began to focus more exclusively on writing when the play I wrote for myself to act in and brought with me to L.A., Gramercy Park Is Closed to the Public, got into the hands of a successful literary agent. The play went out to all the studios, and I immediately began working full-time as a screenwriter. As an actor, I never had the experience of roles being easy to come by. When Hollywood offered me a screenwriting career I took it. It was the path of least resistance. While I think there are more opportunities for women and for women of color now than there were a couple of decades ago, I think it’s still, in general, a challenge. I’ve lost interest in the discussion about how hard things are. EBONY: In a time where young people are studying code and learning to build apps, what can you say to artists about the validity of the studying art forms? TAJ: The work of true artists is timeless. We enjoy art from 500, 100, even hundreds of years ago. Really good art doesn’t lose its value or validity. It may lose its relevance, it may fall in and out of favor. But good art will always be desirable, because it speaks to the soul. The kid who’s passionately studying ballet or saxophone doesn’t need to hear a pep talk from me. If they’re artists, they know why they do it. I so appreciate the people writing code and creating apps. They’re awesome. In fact, they can help artists reach a wider audience. EBONY: A good deal of the conflict in the book stems from commercial and modern concerns being imposed against the will of the artists. How do you feel about the way technology and money have changed the way you practice your art? Or has it? TAJ: As artists, sometimes we have to do things for money in order to be able to do the things we really want to do. In 2014, because I’ve been fortunate enough to have made some money, I’m able to do the kind of work I want to do. And the mental and spiritual approach to the work hasn’t changed that much. But it’s a whole lot easier to make revisions on my computer than it was in 1991, when I wrote a play longhand and then had to type it on a typewriter. Rewriting has certainly become easier with technology. EBONY: The book is sexy but not pornographic. Characters struggle with getting laid by the right people, and maintaining working relationships. Are you a skeptic, or does true love exist only in books and movies? TAJ: I’m not skeptical about true love. I believe in it. My idea of what true love is has changed with time. It’s more than intense longing, deep emotional connection, and sexual passion. My dying father’s girlfriend took care of him and loved him madly even when he was unable to walk and was wearing an adult diaper. The willingness to change a grown man’s diaper is a kind of love that no one wants to see in movies. EBONY: What’s your next book about? And tell us about the film projects that you’re working on. TAJ: My next book is a collection of linked short stories based on my experience as a young woman of color from an upper-middle-class family growing up in a predominantly White, mostly working-class community in upstate New York. This was the ’70s, before The Cosby Show. Kids I grew up with, and even some teachers, didn’t have any exposure to African-Americans like my family. There were people who didn’t want me to attend their children’s parties. A teacher called me liar in front of my middle school English class when I said I’d been to Japan. I couldn’t develop a healthy sense of self in that environment and recognized that at a very early age. It was miserable, but it led to the observation and introspection that helped me to develop as an artist, so I can appreciate it in hindsight. I’m working on a web series for WIGS TV. I’m also working on another dance project with two of the producers I worked with on Save the Last Dance. I’m not able to discuss any details. Read more at EBONY http://www.ebony.com/entertainment-culture/toni-ann-johnson-talks-black-lit-and-hollywood-111#ixzz3EYw2ipXG Follow us: @EbonyMag on Twitter | EbonyMag on Facebook
Screenwriter Toni Ann Johnson Talks Black Lit and Hollywood
www.ebony.com
Toni Ann Johnson is a writer for both film (Step Up 2: The Streets) and television (Ruby Bridges, The Courage to Love). The native New Yorker has taken a break from her screenwriting duties and authored…
30 minutes ago
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