« Colorado Shooting News

Colorado Shooting News posts

Susan Eshleman A week or two ago, a college student ate "an edible" (Colorado-speak for food containing active ingredients found in pot), became deranged and jumped to his death. Now we have this killing that reportedly followed pot consumption (the manner of consu Read more ...
mption is in dispute) and wildly paranoid thoughts. So, we now know that pot kills and it's more of a question of how frequently it kills and under what circumstances. http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/local-news/richard-kirk-arrested-in-wifes-shooting-death-on-st-paul-street-near-university-of-denver
Police probe pot role in Denver woman's killing; victim's husband, Richard Kirk, arrested
www.thedenverchannel.com
Authorities are investigating whether marijuana played a role in the alleged domestic violence killing of a woman in her Denver home.
10 minutes ago
Rich Fegley This was a murder over pot! Pot is LEGAL is Colorado and Washington. In Washington DC these KIDS would have been given a $25 ticket! Legalize marijuana now and stop these pot killings. Pot prohibition caused this crime and murder. http://article Read more ...
s.mcall.com/2014-04-14/news/mc-d-allentown-cumberland-street-shooting-homicide-20140414_1_allentown-man-allentown-police-blackledge
Allentown man killed Sunday was selling pot, DA says; arrests announced
articles.mcall.com
A day after an Allentown man was found dead in a car, a suspect was arrested Monday and accused of shooting the man in the head and neck on the city's south side. Charles D. Washington, 19, was...
1 hour ago
Neon Plastic Lotus Ania Anicca
My Emotional Vampire
- Lisa The Revenge of the Insulted Narcissist The Narcissism Epidemic Jean M. Twenge, Ph.D. It's now emerging that Colorado theater shooter James Holmes failed his graduate school oral exams last month. Although he graduated from UC Riverside wit Read more ...
h honors as an undergraduate, leading the chancellor of the university to say "Academically, he was at the top of the top," those who worked with Holmes directly say his research work was often substandard. In other words, he made good grades in undergraduate classes but struggled with research work and in his graduate program. So after being told for years how smart and brilliant he was, he then found out that he wasn't actually anything special. It's a real-life example of a lab study conducted by Brad Bushman and Roy Baumeister: Students were told that another participant had proclaimed that their essay was "the worst I've ever read." Those who scored high in narcissism then took their revenge by acting aggressively against the person who insulted them. Self-esteem didn't predict who would be more aggressive after an insult, but narcissism did. Keith Campbell and I later found that if the insult was a social rejection, narcissists were also aggressive toward an innocent person—very similar to this shooting and other mass killings such as Columbine and Virginia Tech. In other words, someone who believes they are brilliant is not going to react well to finding out they're not. Holmes doesn't seem like the prototypical narcissist—he's described as, if anything, shy. But his ego may have been pumped up by a system that rewards A's for mediocre performance. In 1976, only 17% of high school students graduated with an A average. Now it's 34%. But being an A student, even at the undergraduate level, doesn't necessarily mean one will do well in graduate school or do good research. By inflating grades, we're setting students up for failure. Many will come to the difficult realization that they are not as special as they've been told and will react badly to this news. We don't know if this is the story of what happened to James Holmes, but it's a narrative that plays out for many young people today, though thankfully not with such violent consequences. It also goes far beyond grades—American culture has become increasingly focused on the illusion of greatness rather than greatness itself. We seem to think that if we give every kid a trophy, every kid is a winner. That's just not true. Yes, we can reward effort early on. But we don't have to overpraise mediocre performance in the hopes it will lead to better results. One study actually shows that self-esteem boosting leads to failure, not success. When I give talks on narcissism to undergraduates, they often tell me "We have to be narcissistic because the world is so competitive." Yes, things are competitive, but thinking that you're better than you actually are—the definition of narcissism—is a formula for disappointment and bitterness, not for success.
3 hours ago
Johann P Natan "......the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom." (From a Letter by Lincoln) The toughest thing is to try to assuage the grief and console the spouse of a fallen soldier. Its a painful and del Read more ...
icate matter to say the least. This post below made its way to the wife of one of my fallen buddies, mentioned in the post below. Though I never knew her back then, she managed to find me last night and I had the honor of spending several hours both telling her all kinds of great things about her husband, his team mates and other personalities in the unit, and great stories about our unit. She is still grieving and never remarried. This is the very common plight of military spouses. Everyone knew what an outstanding person and family man that he was. But, I got her to laugh a lot and she is proud that the story will be in my book and that I didn't forget what happened, why it happened, and how great her husband and my team mate was. A shining example for all to follow. I really don't think that most people realize the tremendous sacrifices and toil made by the families of military personnel.
Johann P Natan
Anniversary -- 20 Years Ago today 2 people that I worked with and knew very well were amongst 26 people killed in a military event overseas. They were on a peaceful mission in 2 military helicopters as part of a Humanitarian Assistance mission that Read more ...
my unit supported called Operation Provide Comfort I, II, III and Operation Northern Watch (No-Fly Zone over Iraq) This was the multinational effort that saved over 500,000 Iraqi Kurdish citizens during a major refugee crisis that began in 1991. Saddam Hussein had been using nerve gas to kill these people and doing other things to persecute them. When in upwards of a million of them fled to the north towards Turkey, NATO came to the rescue and my unit was at the front of this effort. Several hundred Kurdish people per day were dying at the height of the crisis. Our guys had to do everything from coordinate air drops of food and medicine, to digging wells, to delivering babies (some guys in my team hold records for this). We jokingly called it "Operation Provide Groceries." But, while trying to protect the Kurds, two of my team mates hit a minefield during the first part of this mission. But, the Iraqi military stayed away from us. For more than a decade after this, aerial patrols and some ground missions continued as part of a UN mandated No-Fly-Zone and Gulf War Ceasefire. On April 14, 1994, the 2 Eagle Flight UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters were visiting the Kurds not far from Zakhu, Iraq when our U.S. Air Force misidentified them as Iraqi and hostile while doing a routine mission to enforce the No-Fly Zone above the 36th Parallel (36 degrees latitude) There were no survivors. The two crash sites had pretty much nothing left. Some of my team mates who went on the rescue operation now have PTSD and other trauma due to it. I got to hear every detail. My two friends were: Ricky L. Robinson Paul N. Barclay Both were U.S. Army Special Forces soldiers and had volunteered for that mission. This was my part of the unit's third long trip over there in 3 years for the humanitarian part and 5th overall. Each unit took turns going for 3 months. We had been all over together. You get to know so much about people when you spend day in and out with them and in stressful or challenging conditions. A few months prior, we had been on ski & winter warfare training and then way up in Canada doing cold weather and other training, where Paul and Ricky were in a class that I had to give. That was the last time that I saw them. These were two of the nicest people that you could ever hope to meet. Both were also very serious about their jobs, yet more laid back and not as high strung as guys like me. (I have acquired multiple nicknames over the years due to my high energy level and being into my job) Ricky and I had served in a another Special Forces unit together and I had known him longer than anyone in the unit. He had a young step-son that he was very proud of. Everyone always stared at his tall pretty wife. Ricky always wore his wedding ring. The day that this horrible accident happened, several people came to find me. I was at another location as the unit was split in different locations as we were on the countdown for possible offensive action in Bosnia, Rwanda, and Haiti all simultaneously. I will never forget the looks on their faces as they approached me. They brought the unit Chaplain and one other person of significance. It happened in slow motion. My heart sank when they very cautiously broke the news. Then, they then asked if I might be able to identify Ricky. I remember being so numb and messed up after this that I could not get my keys in my ignition, so I walked back to my room at the barracks that night and spent all night awake praying that it wasn't true, hoping that it had been mistaken information. There are procedures in place and technologies used to prevent these types of "friendly fire" accidents. But, something went terribly wrong in the skies above mountainous northern Iraq. Coincidentally, I once flew with the crew of the giant E-3 Sentry AWACS plane that gave the authorization to shoot them down. We also all knew that the fighter pilots were all trigger happy. I also know that our military was being over extended as someone had the stupid idea to start reducing our military at the end of the Cold War. So, the news of the shootdown was beginning to hit the TV news. The government conducted a big cover up of what really happened. Ricky's wife and others fought a very public battle to get the truth. I remember seeing her being interviewed on TV and it looked like she was crying. I was part of Ricky's massive wake and funeral in Rifle, Colorado. It was a reunion of sorts. So, so, so painful that was. My former team commander came up and held me after the ceremony. Paul is in Arlington National Cemetery. Exactly 10 years later, another member of my unit, who had given the Eulogy for these men at a large memorial service, was killed in the same country and area during our second war there.(note: he is mentioned and shown at the very end of a National Geographic documentary called "Arlington Field of Honor.") Also lost at that time was Ricky and Paul's Special Forces team sergeant from back in 1994, who had gone to try to rescue them 20 years ago tonight. All 4 of these men were people that I admired and even looked up to. It took me years to realize that I had over time adopted the professional ethics of one of them. I wrote all about this event and all of this in my book manuscript, as it speaks to many issues. Many of us alumni have been in touch about this over the past 2 days. Most people don't even know about or remember these sacrifices. But, I do. So, this is an especially tough month of "anniversaries."
8 hours ago
Dan Baker I really have a hard time seeing the humor in this.
Timeline Photos
BREAKING NEWS!!!!!! Colorado hunter Fred Eichler shoots big foot while scouting for turkeys in remote area of southern Colorado . Fred was quoted as saying " I was surprised to see one this early in the year". He also stated "this is not the first on Read more ...
e I have taken". Only two tags were given out by the Colorado division of wildlife and Fred drew one of these coveted tags. In an interview with the Sportsmans channel Fred said that they , "taste like chicken" he is also claiming to have one upped Chuck Adams as chuck has never harvested a Bigfoot. #aprilfools First Lite Hoyt Archery: Maker of the World's Best Bows Easton Archery Easton Outfitters Muzzy Broadheads Realtree Outdoors® Truglo
11 hours ago
My Emotional Vampire - Lisa The Revenge of the Insulted Narcissist The Narcissism Epidemic Jean M. Twenge, Ph.D. It's now emerging that Colorado theater shooter James Holmes failed his graduate school oral exams last month. Although he graduated from UC Riverside wit Read more ...
h honors as an undergraduate, leading the chancellor of the university to say "Academically, he was at the top of the top," those who worked with Holmes directly say his research work was often substandard. In other words, he made good grades in undergraduate classes but struggled with research work and in his graduate program. So after being told for years how smart and brilliant he was, he then found out that he wasn't actually anything special. It's a real-life example of a lab study conducted by Brad Bushman and Roy Baumeister: Students were told that another participant had proclaimed that their essay was "the worst I've ever read." Those who scored high in narcissism then took their revenge by acting aggressively against the person who insulted them. Self-esteem didn't predict who would be more aggressive after an insult, but narcissism did. Keith Campbell and I later found that if the insult was a social rejection, narcissists were also aggressive toward an innocent person—very similar to this shooting and other mass killings such as Columbine and Virginia Tech. In other words, someone who believes they are brilliant is not going to react well to finding out they're not. Holmes doesn't seem like the prototypical narcissist—he's described as, if anything, shy. But his ego may have been pumped up by a system that rewards A's for mediocre performance. In 1976, only 17% of high school students graduated with an A average. Now it's 34%. But being an A student, even at the undergraduate level, doesn't necessarily mean one will do well in graduate school or do good research. By inflating grades, we're setting students up for failure. Many will come to the difficult realization that they are not as special as they've been told and will react badly to this news. We don't know if this is the story of what happened to James Holmes, but it's a narrative that plays out for many young people today, though thankfully not with such violent consequences. It also goes far beyond grades—American culture has become increasingly focused on the illusion of greatness rather than greatness itself. We seem to think that if we give every kid a trophy, every kid is a winner. That's just not true. Yes, we can reward effort early on. But we don't have to overpraise mediocre performance in the hopes it will lead to better results. One study actually shows that self-esteem boosting leads to failure, not success. When I give talks on narcissism to undergraduates, they often tell me "We have to be narcissistic because the world is so competitive." Yes, things are competitive, but thinking that you're better than you actually are—the definition of narcissism—is a formula for disappointment and bitterness, not for success.
14 hours ago
Tony Russo
Bruce Hennes
One-hundred years ago today, my great-uncle Mike walked from Newark, New Jersey to San Francisco. A few months earlier, the Lincoln Highway, the first coast-to-coast, paved road for automobiles, opened for business, starting at Times Square in NYC a Read more ...
nd ending at Lincoln Park in San Francisco. Apparently, walking the entire length of the new road was the thing to do, so on April 13, 1913, great-uncle Mike Singer started his walk, arriving six months later. Along the way, he sent back dispatches to the Newark Evening News with descriptions of the trip, including reference to shooting coyotes during the long trek across Utah. At the end of the trip, tired and broke, the Great Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco was in full-swing. Mike and his walking buddy sold postcards regaling their feat to pay for the train ride home. Great-uncle Mike later went off to serve in World War I. Today, I tip my hat to him. To give you a taste of what Mike Singer faced while walking, here's what motorists found (source: Wikipedia): According to the Association's 1916 Official Road Guide a trip from the Atlantic to the Pacific on the Lincoln Highway was "something of a sporting proposition" and might take 20 to 30 days. To make it in 30 days the motorist would need to average 18 miles (29 km) an hour for 6 hours per day, and driving was only done during daylight hours. Since gasoline stations were still rare in many parts of the country, motorists were urged to top off their gasoline at every opportunity, even if they had done so recently. Motorists should wade through water before driving through to verify the depth. The list of recommended equipment included chains, a shovel, axe, jacks, tire casings and inner tubes, tools, and (of course) a pair of Lincoln Highway pennants. And, the guide offered this sage advice: "Don't wear new shoes." Firearms were not necessary, but west of Omaha full camping equipment was recommended, and the guide warned against drinking alkali water that could cause serious cramps. In certain areas, advice was offered on getting help, for example near Fish Springs, Utah, "If trouble is experienced, build a sagebrush fire. Mr. Thomas will come with a team. He can see you 20 miles off." Later editions omitted Mr. Thomas, but westbound travelers were advised to stop at the Orr's Ranch for advice, and eastbound motorists were to check with Mr. K.C. Davis of Gold Hill, Nevada.The Lincoln Highway originally passed through 13 states: New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, and California. In 1915, the "Colorado Loop" was removed, and in 1928, a realignment relocated the Lincoln Highway through the northern tip of West Virginia. Thus, there are a total of 14 states, 128 counties, and over 700 cities, towns and villages through which the highway passed at some time in its history. Great-uncle Mike saw them all.
14 hours ago
Chuck Huber [excerpt] The defense policy bill is always an attractive target for add-ons because it is considered the one must-pass piece of policy legislation every year. Republicans have been looking at the defense bill as other chances for immigration debate Read more ...
have faded. Rep. Mike Coffman of Colorado and Rep. Jeff Denham of California have filed bills to let some young illegal immigrants join the military and be granted legal permanent residence, labeled as a green card, which is a key step on the pathway to citizenship. The young illegal immigrants in question are considered among the most sympathetic cases in the immigration debate. Most were brought to the U.S. by their parents, with little say in the matter, and often have no knowledge of their birth countries. [end excerpt] http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/apr/15/american-legion-shoots-down-idea-to-tie-immigratio/
American Legion shoots down idea to tie immigration to military service
www.washingtontimes.com
The American Legion says it is opposed to trying to tie immigration into the annual defense policy debate, calling it an unacceptable “amnesty” and dealing a serious blow to Republicans desperate to pass some sort of legalization of illegal immig Read more ...
rants ahead of November’s elections.
15 hours ago
Sisto Tapia A woman accused of hurling a soccer cleat at former Secretary of State Hilary Clinton during a speech last week reportedly has a bizarre history with accused Aurora shooter James Holmes. Alison Ernst, 36, of Phoenix, was released from Clark County J Read more ...
ail with a misdemeanor disorderly conduct summons after the incident during Clinton's speech for the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries on Thursday. Nearly two years prior to the shoe incident, Ernst appeared in a Colorado courtroom during one of Holmes' appearances, claiming she had evidence that he was innocent of the Aurora movie theatre shooting, which killed 12 and left 58 wounded in July 2012, the New York Daily News reports. After Ernst was removed from the courtroom she filed a motion alleging that Holmes was "mind-controlled" by a ring of "worldwide crooks." The motion was later dismissed by a judge, the National Journal reports. "Holmes is an innocent man. James Holmes must be released to me asap. This is a huge conspiracy," read Ernst's motion, which also alleged that a movie theatre chain owner was the culprit of the Aurora shooting and claimed he was part of a massive conspiracy led by a group that "want[s] to control the world through false flag attacks akin to George Orwell 1984 [sic]."
Woman Who Threw Shoe At Hillary Clinton Has Bizarre History With Aurora Shooter
m.huffpost.com
A woman accused of hurling a soccer cleat at former Secretary of State Hilary Clinton during a speech last week reportedly has a bizarre history with accused Aurora shooter James Holmes. Alison Ernst, 36, of Phoenix, was released from Clark Count...
16 hours ago
Harold Moore EVANSTON, Ill. — WHEN Frazier Glenn Miller shot and killed three people in Overland Park, Kan., on Sunday, he did so as a soldier of the white power movement: a groundswell that united Klansmen, neo-Nazis and other fringe elements after the Vietnam Read more ...
War, crested with the bombing of the Oklahoma City federal building in 1995, and remains a diminished but potent threat today. Mr. Miller, the 73-year-old man charged in the killings, had been outspoken about his hatred of Jews, blacks, Communists and immigrants, but it would be a mistake to dismiss him as a crazed outlier. The shootings were consistent with his three decades of participation in organized hate groups. His violence was framed by a clear worldview. You can’t predict whether any one person will commit violence, but it would be hard to think of someone more befitting of law enforcement scrutiny than Mr. Miller (who also goes by the name Frazier Glenn Cross). I’ve been studying the white radical right since 2006. In my review of tens of thousands of pages of once classified federal records, as well as newly available archives of Klan and neo-Nazi publications, Mr. Miller appears as a central figure of the white power movement. The number of Vietnam veterans in that movement was small — a tiny proportion of those who served — but Vietnam veterans forged the first links between Klansmen and Nazis since World War II. They were central in leading Klan and neo-Nazi groups past the anti-civil rights backlash of the 1960s and toward paramilitary violence. The white power movement they forged had strongholds not only in the South, but also in the Pacific Northwest, Colorado, California and Pennsylvania. Its members carried weapons like those they had used in Vietnam, and used boot-camp rhetoric to frame their pursuit of domestic enemies. They condoned violence against innocent people and, eventually, the state itself. Before his 1979 discharge for distributing racist literature, Mr. Miller served for 20 years in the Army, including two tours in Vietnam and service as a Green Beret. Later that year he took part (but was not charged) in a deadly shooting of Communist protesters in Greensboro, N.C. In 1980, Mr. Miller formed a Klan-affiliated organization in North Carolina that eventually was known as the White Patriot Party. He outfitted members in camouflage fatigues. He paraded his neo-Nazis, in uniform and bearing arms, up and down streets. They patrolled schools and polling places, supposedly to protect whites from harassment. F.B.I. documents show that they also burned crosses. By 1986, Mr. Miller’s group claimed 2,500 members in five southern states. The archives also show that Mr. Miller received large sums of money from The Order, a white power group in the Pacific Northwest, to buy land and weapons to put his followers through paramilitary training. Mr. Miller’s group paid $50,000 for weapons and matériel stolen from the armory at Fort Bragg, N.C., including anti-tank rockets, mines and plastic explosives. He targeted active-duty troops for recruitment and hired them to conduct training exercises. Mr. Miller’s downfall came after the Southern Poverty Law Center filed a lawsuit on behalf of black North Carolinians; as part of a settlement in 1985, he agreed to stop operating a paramilitary organization. In 1987, a federal judge found that Mr. Miller had violated the agreement, and barred him from contacting others in the white power movement. Outraged, and anticipating criminal charges regarding the stolen military weapons, Mr. Miller briefly went underground. He would write in a self-published autobiography, “Since they wouldn’t allow me to fight them legally above ground, then I’d resort to the only means left, armed revolution.” He was later caught with a small arsenal, but he began cooperating with prosecutors, testifying against other white supremacists in exchange for a reduced sentence. He was released in 1990, after serving three years. In 2009, the Department of Homeland Security issued a nine-page report detailing the threat of domestic terrorism by the white power movement. This short document outlined no specific threats, but rather a set of historical factors that had predicted white-supremacist activity in the past — like economic pressure, opposition to immigration and gun-control legislation — and a new factor, the election of a black president. The report singled out one factor that has fueled every surge in Ku Klux Klan membership in American history, from the 1860s to the present: war. The return of veterans from combat appears to correlate more closely with Klan membership than any other historical factor. “Military veterans facing significant challenges reintegrating into their communities could lead to the potential emergence of terrorist groups or lone wolf extremists carrying out violent attacks,” the report warned. The agency was “concerned that right-wing extremists will attempt to recruit and radicalize returning veterans in order to boost their violent capabilities.” The report raised intense blowback from the American Legion, Fox News and conservative members of Congress. They demanded an apology and denounced the idea that any veteran could commit an act of domestic terrorism. The department shelved the report, removing it from its website. The threat, however, proved real. Mr. Miller obviously represents an extreme, both in his politics and in his violence. A vast majority of veterans are neither violent nor mentally ill. When they turn violent, they often harm themselves, by committing suicide. But it would be irresponsible to overlook the high rates of combat trauma among the 2.4 million Americans who have served in our wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the full impact of which has not yet materialized. Veterans of those conflicts represent just 10 percent of those getting mental health services through the Department of Veterans Affairs, where the overwhelming majority of those in treatment are still Vietnam veterans. During Mr. Miller’s long membership in the white power movement, its leaders have robbed armored cars, engaged in counterfeiting and the large-scale theft of military weapons, and carried out or planned killings. The bombing by Timothy J. McVeigh, an Army veteran, of the federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995, which killed 168 people, was only the most dramatic of these crimes. When we interpret shootings like the one on Sunday as acts of mad, lone-wolf gunmen, we fail to see white power as an organized — and deadly — social movement. That Mr. Miller was able to carry out an act of domestic terror at two locations despite his history of violent behavior should alarm anyone concerned about public safety. Would he have received greater scrutiny had he been a Muslim, a foreigner, not white, not a veteran? The answer is clear, and alarming. Kathleen Belew, a postdoctoral fellow in history at Northwestern University, is at work on a book on Vietnam veterans and the radical right.
22 hours ago
Lois Ann Struwe Newton Maybe she's just a little bit off her rocker? //Nearly two years prior to the shoe incident, Ernst appeared in a Colorado courtroom during one of Holmes' appearances, claiming she had evidence that he was innocent of the Aurora movie theatre shootin Read more ...
g, which killed 12 and left 58 wounded in July 2012, the New York Daily News reports. After Ernst was removed from the courtroom she filed a motion alleging that Holmes was "mind-controlled" by a ring of "worldwide crooks." The motion was later dismissed by a judge, the National Journal reports. "Holmes is an innocent man. James Holmes must be released to me asap. This is a huge conspiracy," read Ernst's motion, which also alleged that a movie theatre chain owner was the culprit of the Aurora shooting and claimed he was part of a massive conspiracy led by a group that "want[s] to control the world through false flag attacks akin to George Orwell 1984 [sic]."// http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/14/clinton-shoe-thrower-james-homles-_n_5147038.html
Woman Who Threw Shoe At Hillary Clinton Has Bizarre History With Aurora Shooter
www.huffingtonpost.com
A woman accused of hurling a soccer cleat at former Secretary of State Hilary Clinton during a speech last week reportedly has a bizarre history with accused Aurora shooter James Holmes. Alison Ernst, 36, of Phoenix, was released from Clark Count...
23 hours ago
Bruce Granat Veterans and White Supremacy By KATHLEEN BELEW APRIL 15, 2014 NYTimes EVANSTON, Ill. — WHEN Frazier Glenn Miller shot and killed three people in Overland Park, Kan., on Sunday, he did so as a soldier of the white power movement: a groundswell th Read more ...
at united Klansmen, neo-Nazis and other fringe elements after the Vietnam War, crested with the bombing of the Oklahoma City federal building in 1995, and remains a diminished but potent threat today. Mr. Miller, the 73-year-old man charged in the killings, had been outspoken about his hatred of Jews, blacks, Communists and immigrants, but it would be a mistake to dismiss him as a crazed outlier. The shootings were consistent with his three decades of participation in organized hate groups. His violence was framed by a clear worldview. You can’t predict whether any one person will commit violence, but it would be hard to think of someone more befitting of law enforcement scrutiny than Mr. Miller (who also goes by the name Frazier Glenn Cross). I’ve been studying the white radical right since 2006. In my review of tens of thousands of pages of once classified federal records, as well as newly available archives of Klan and neo-Nazi publications, Mr. Miller appears as a central figure of the white power movement. The number of Vietnam veterans in that movement was small — a tiny proportion of those who served — but Vietnam veterans forged the first links between Klansmen and Nazis since World War II. They were central in leading Klan and neo-Nazi groups past the anti-civil rights backlash of the 1960s and toward paramilitary violence. The white power movement they forged had strongholds not only in the South, but also in the Pacific Northwest, Colorado, California and Pennsylvania. Its members carried weapons like those they had used in Vietnam, and used boot-camp rhetoric to frame their pursuit of domestic enemies. They condoned violence against innocent people and, eventually, the state itself. Before his 1979 discharge for distributing racist literature, Mr. Miller served for 20 years in the Army, including two tours in Vietnam and service as a Green Beret. Later that year he took part (but was not charged) in a deadly shooting of Communist protesters in Greensboro, N.C. In 1980, Mr. Miller formed a Klan-affiliated organization in North Carolina that eventually was known as the White Patriot Party. He outfitted members in camouflage fatigues. He paraded his neo-Nazis, in uniform and bearing arms, up and down streets. They patrolled schools and polling places, supposedly to protect whites from harassment. F.B.I. documents show that they also burned crosses. By 1986, Mr. Miller’s group claimed 2,500 members in five southern states. The archives also show that Mr. Miller received large sums of money from The Order, a white power group in the Pacific Northwest, to buy land and weapons to put his followers through paramilitary training. Mr. Miller’s group paid $50,000 for weapons and matériel stolen from the armory at Fort Bragg, N.C., including anti-tank rockets, mines and plastic explosives. He targeted active-duty troops for recruitment and hired them to conduct training exercises. Continue reading the main story Continue reading the main story Advertisement Mr. Miller’s downfall came after the Southern Poverty Law Center filed a lawsuit on behalf of black North Carolinians; as part of a settlement in 1985, he agreed to stop operating a paramilitary organization. In 1987, a federal judge found that Mr. Miller had violated the agreement, and barred him from contacting others in the white power movement. Outraged, and anticipating criminal charges regarding the stolen military weapons, Mr. Miller briefly went underground. He would write in a self-published autobiography, “Since they wouldn’t allow me to fight them legally above ground, then I’d resort to the only means left, armed revolution.” He was later caught with a small arsenal, but he began cooperating with prosecutors, testifying against other white supremacists in exchange for a reduced sentence. He was released in 1990, after serving three years. In 2009, the Department of Homeland Security issued a nine-page report detailing the threat of domestic terrorism by the white power movement. This short document outlined no specific threats, but rather a set of historical factors that had predicted white-supremacist activity in the past — like economic pressure, opposition to immigration and gun-control legislation — and a new factor, the election of a black president. The report singled out one factor that has fueled every surge in Ku Klux Klan membership in American history, from the 1860s to the present: war. The return of veterans from combat appears to correlate more closely with Klan membership than any other historical factor. “Military veterans facing significant challenges reintegrating into their communities could lead to the potential emergence of terrorist groups or lone wolf extremists carrying out violent attacks,” the report warned. The agency was “concerned that right-wing extremists will attempt to recruit and radicalize returning veterans in order to boost their violent capabilities.” The report raised intense blowback from the American Legion, Fox News and conservative members of Congress. They demanded an apology and denounced the idea that any veteran could commit an act of domestic terrorism. The department shelved the report, removing it from its website. The threat, however, proved real. Mr. Miller obviously represents an extreme, both in his politics and in his violence. A vast majority of veterans are neither violent nor mentally ill. When they turn violent, they often harm themselves, by committing suicide. But it would be irresponsible to overlook the high rates of combat trauma among the 2.4 million Americans who have served in our wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the full impact of which has not yet materialized. Veterans of those conflicts represent just 10 percent of those getting mental health services through the Department of Veterans Affairs, where the overwhelming majority of those in treatment are still Vietnam veterans. During Mr. Miller’s long membership in the white power movement, its leaders have robbed armored cars, engaged in counterfeiting and the large-scale theft of military weapons, and carried out or planned killings. The bombing by Timothy J. McVeigh, an Army veteran, of the federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995, which killed 168 people, was only the most dramatic of these crimes. When we interpret shootings like the one on Sunday as acts of mad, lone-wolf gunmen, we fail to see white power as an organized — and deadly — social movement. That Mr. Miller was able to carry out an act of domestic terror at two locations despite his history of violent behavior should alarm anyone concerned about public safety. Would he have received greater scrutiny had he been a Muslim, a foreigner, not white, not a veteran? The answer is clear, and alarming. Kathleen Belew, a postdoctoral fellow in history at Northwestern University, is at work on a book on Vietnam veterans and the radical right.
23 hours ago
Henri Fourroux TIME Time to get fed up again!: http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2012/dec/29/fbi-coordinated-crackdown-occupy It was more sophisticated than we had imagined: new documents show that the violent crackdown on Occupy last fall – so mystif Read more ...
ying at the time – was not just coordinated at the level of the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security, and local police. The crackdown, which involved, as you may recall, violent arrests, group disruption, canister missiles to the skulls of protesters, people held in handcuffs so tight they were injured, people held in bondage till they were forced to wet or soil themselves –was coordinated with the big banks themselves. The Partnership for Civil Justice Fund, in a groundbreaking scoop that should once more shame major US media outlets (why are nonprofits now some of the only entities in America left breaking major civil liberties news?), filed this request. The document – reproduced here in an easily searchable format – shows a terrifying network of coordinated DHS, FBI, police, regional fusion center, and private-sector activity so completely merged into one another that the monstrous whole is, in fact, one entity: in some cases, bearing a single name, the Domestic Security Alliance Council. And it reveals this merged entity to have one centrally planned, locally executed mission. The documents, in short, show the cops and DHS working for and with banks to target, arrest, and politically disable peaceful American citizens. The documents, released after long delay in the week between Christmas and New Year, show a nationwide meta-plot unfolding in city after city in an Orwellian world: six American universities are sites where campus police funneled information about students involved with OWS to the FBI, with the administrations' knowledge (p51); banks sat down with FBI officials to pool information about OWS protesters harvested by private security; plans to crush Occupy events, planned for a month down the road, were made by the FBI – and offered to the representatives of the same organizations that the protests would target; and even threats of the assassination of OWS leaders by sniper fire – by whom? Where? – now remain redacted and undisclosed to those American citizens in danger, contrary to standard FBI practice to inform the person concerned when there is a threat against a political leader (p61). As Mara Verheyden-Hilliard, executive director of the PCJF, put it, the documents show that from the start, the FBI – though it acknowledgesOccupy movement as being, in fact, a peaceful organization – nonetheless designated OWS repeatedly as a "terrorist threat": "FBI documents just obtained by the Partnership for Civil Justice Fund (PCJF) … reveal that from its inception, the FBI treated the Occupy movement as a potential criminal and terrorist threat … The PCJF has obtained heavily redacted documents showing that FBI offices and agents around the country were in high gear conducting surveillance against the movement even as early as August 2011, a month prior to the establishment of the OWS encampment in Zuccotti Park and other Occupy actions around the country." Verheyden-Hilliard points out the close partnering of banks, the New York Stock Exchange and at least one local Federal Reserve with the FBI and DHS, and calls it "police-statism": "This production [of documents], which we believe is just the tip of the iceberg, is a window into the nationwide scope of the FBI's surveillance, monitoring, and reporting on peaceful protestors organizing with the Occupy movement … These documents also show these federal agencies functioning as a de facto intelligence arm of Wall Street and Corporate America." The documents show stunning range: in Denver, Colorado, that branch of the FBI and a "Bank Fraud Working Group" met in November 2011 – during the Occupy protests – to surveil the group. The Federal Reserve of Richmond, Virginia had its own private security surveilling Occupy Tampa and Tampa Veterans for Peace and passing privately-collected information on activists back to the Richmond FBI, which, in turn, categorized OWS activities under its "domestic terrorism" unit. The Anchorage, Alaska "terrorism task force" was watching Occupy Anchorage. The Jackson, Mississippi "joint terrorism task force" was issuing a "counterterrorism preparedness alert" about the ill-organized grandmas and college sophomores in Occupy there. Also in Jackson, Mississippi, the FBI and the "Bank Security Group" – multiple private banks – met to discuss the reaction to "National Bad Bank Sit-in Day" (the response was violent, as you may recall). The Virginia FBI sent that state's Occupy members' details to the Virginia terrorism fusion center. The Memphis FBI tracked OWS under its "joint terrorism task force" aegis, too. And so on, for over 100 pages. Jason Leopold, at Truthout.org, who has sought similar documents for more than a year, reported that the FBI falsely asserted in response to his own FOIA requests that no documents related to its infiltration of Occupy Wall Street existed at all. But the release may be strategic: if you are an Occupy activist and see how your information is being sent to terrorism task forces and fusion centers, not to mention the "longterm plans" of some redacted group to shoot you, this document is quite the deterrent. There is a new twist: the merger of the private sector, DHS and the FBI means that any of us can become WikiLeaks, a point that Julian Assange was trying to make in explaining the argument behind his recent book. The fusion of the tracking of money and the suppression of dissent means that a huge area of vulnerability in civil society – people's income streams and financial records – is now firmly in the hands of the banks, which are, in turn, now in the business of tracking your dissent. Remember that only 10% of the money donated to WikiLeaks can be processed – because of financial sector and DHS-sponsored targeting of PayPal data. With this merger, that crushing of one's personal or business financial freedom can happen to any of us. How messy, criminalizing and prosecuting dissent. How simple, by contrast, just to label an entity a "terrorist organization" and choke off, disrupt or indict its sources of financing. Why the huge push for counterterrorism "fusion centers", the DHS militarizing of police departments, and so on? It was never really about "the terrorists". It was not even about civil unrest. It was always about this moment, when vast crimes might be uncovered by citizens – it was always, that is to say, meant to be about you. • This article originally referred to a joint terrorism task force in Jackson, Michigan. This was amended to Jackson, Mississippi at 4pm ET on 2 January 2012
Revealed: how the FBI coordinated the crackdown on Occupy | Naomi Wolf
www.theguardian.com
Naomi Wolf: New documents prove what was once dismissed as paranoid fantasy: totally integrated corporate-state repression of dissent
1 day ago
Jack Kochenour A note from Bishop Dean Wolfe, Ninth Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Kansas. A statement in response to the Jewish Community Center shootings “Hatred makes everyone look like the enemy.” April 14, 2014 The news of an armed man shootin Read more ...
g and killing a teenager and his grandfather at the Jewish Community Center in Overland Park, and a woman at the Village Shalom assisted living facility, is another shocking reminder of the culture of violence that continues to flourish within our larger culture. We are particularly saddened to learn these murders appear to have been motivated by anti-Semitic feelings expressed by the man now in custody for these crimes. On Sunday, the violence came to us. These are our neighbors. These are our friends. This is not somewhere strange and far away for us. These violent incidents happened in our diocese. My son played several basketball games at the Jewish Community Center when he was a student at Bishop Seabury Academy. We have friends who regularly participate in programs there. On Sunday afternoon the Jewish Community Center was filled with young people from a myriad of faith traditions rehearsing plays and auditioning for musical competitions. It says something about the way in which people of different faith traditions live and work so closely together in our community that a man intent on killing members of the Jewish faith went to a Jewish Community Center and a Jewish assisted care facility and took the lives of two Metdists and a Roman Catholic. Hatred makes everyone look like the enemy. We grieve with those who have lost their loved ones, and our hearts are broken by this senseless tragedy. So what should we do now? First, we do what people of faith have done for thousands of years when faced with tragedy. We gather together. We retell the ancient stories of our faith. We share our grief. We hold tightly to one another. We hold our children closer. We call upon our God to comfort us. On Sunday evening the Reverend Gar Demo, the Reverend Ben Varnum and the people of Saint Thomas the Apostle in Overland Park opened their church for an interfaith service of “Light in the Midst of Darkness.” Working with Rabbi Jacques Cukierkorn of Temple Israel, they invited a number of community, ecumenical and interfaith leaders to speak and to pray. It was an extremely moving worship experience featuring the faith-filled testimony of the mother who lost her son and her father in this tragedy. We can say we are shocked by these events. And we are. We can say we are saddened. And that expression does not even begin to communicate our profound heartbreak. What we cannot say is we are surprised. Shootings and violent incidents like this one occur almost weekly in the United States of America. When will it stop? What will the faith community do about it? This epidemic of violence has become a significant public health issue that calls for a response. What does it tell us when our children sound like old hands when it comes to tactics like “sheltering in place” or “locking down?” Due to the frequency of these shootings, our children have practiced these tactics for years. From the school shootings at Columbine, to the massacre of innocents at Sandy Hook Elementary School, to the mass murder of people attending a movie in Aurora, Colorado, this has become the new normal. It is not acceptable. In this most holy of weeks, let us continue to pray for all those affected by this tragedy, and let us prayerfully consider what each of us can do to stop this vicious cycle of violence.
2 days ago
740 KVOR This morning on Southern Colorado's Morning News... An overnight shooting is under investigation which left one teen injured. Twelve families were displaced after a late night apartment fire. And, new standards for the use of solitary confinement in Read more ...
Colorado.
2 days ago
Vaughn Hall
Doug Vaughan
This was said by Chuck Norris and I think he's right on the money. 3Lessons Our Politicians Should Learn From Fort Hood Apr. 08, 2014 As with all Americans,my wife,Gena, and I had our hearts broken again last Wednesday as we heard about anotherkill Read more ...
ing spree at Fort Hood, Texas, in which fourpeople died and 16 more were injured at the U.S.Army's largest active-duty installation. Chelsea Schilling,WorldNetDaily's commentator editor and journalist extraordinaire,reported shortly after the tragedy:"The shooter,identified as 34-year-old Ivan Lopez,is among the dead. Lopez reportedly died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound," but only after being confronted by a courageous female military police officerin the parking lot. (Interestingly, it was also a female cop who felt responsible for thwarting the Fort Hood gunman in 2009. Nidal Malik Hasan killed 13 people -- the deadliest attack on a domestic military base in U.S. history.) Lt. Gen. Mark Milley,III Corps commander at Fort Hood, said the shooterlast week was a soldier who was under evaluation forpost-traumatic stress disorder. Tragically, Lopez tipped from one mental health extreme to the other. The New YorkTimes reported: "On March 1, the same day he purchased the .45-caliber semiautomatic pistol he used in the attack, Specialist Lopez wrote an especially angry and vaguely threatening post. 'My spiritual peace has all gone away,I am full of hate,I believe now the devil is taking me. I was robbed last night and I'm sure it was two flacos.Green light and thumbs down. It's just that easy.'" If there is confusion on a few fronts of combat,one thing is very clear:The Obama administration hasn't learned jack from the mass shooting at the Washington Navy Yard last September or the Fort Hood massacres in 2009 and last week. So let me help. First, the White House needs to pull its head out of the sands of war denial and delusion. If the 2009 Fort Hood massacre wasn't labeled by the Obama administration as "terror," we can expect it to neutralize last week's tragic shooting,as well. There's a reason formerDefense Secretary Robert Gates labeled Obama the duck-and-dodge commanderin chief in his book "Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War." Gates described Obama this way: "I thought: The president doesn't trust his commander... doesn't believe in his own strategy and doesn't consider the war to be his. For him, it's all about getting out." And a new poll from The Washington Post and the Kaiser Family Foundation reported that only 42 percent of military veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan said they believe that Obama is a "good commander in chief of the military." Forty-eight percent said he is not. In comparison,65 percent of veterans said President George W.Bush was a good commanderin chief. The president doesn't understand warorour warriors, but that shouldn't stop him from standing up for them and continually fighting fortheir welfare on and off the combat field. Second,the U.S. must do more to help treat, transition and better acclimate returning service members from the battlefieldinstead of throwing them to the lions of PTSD. USA Today just ran an article on the subject, saying: "About 1,000 veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan war era are diagnosed each week with post-traumatic stress disorderand more than 800 with depression,according to (Department of Veterans Affairs) statistics. "The Pentagon said Thursday that more than 155,000 U.S. troops have PTSD and that more than three-quarters of them are combat veterans. "The disorder is characterized by symptoms such as flashbacks,nightmares, emotional numbness orhyper-vigilance that follow a traumatic experience. The symptoms persist, becoming more severe ratherthan going away and lasting longerthan a month,said Paula Schnurr,acting executive directorat the VA's National Centerfor PTSD." Third,junk the gun-free zones on military bases. WND's Matt Barber wrote: "Notice a trend here? What do Sandy Hook Elementary,Aurora Colorado's Century 16 theatre,Columbine,Fort Hood No.1 and Fort Hood No. 2 all have in common? They're all 'gun-free zones.' "Oh,that ratherthan 'gun-free zone,' each of these terror sites had a sign reading:'Staff heavily armed and trained. Any attempts to harm those herein will be met with deadly force.' "Might some of those beautiful souls have yet died before one or more well-armed good guys could take out the well-armed bad guys?Perhaps. But how many precious lives could have been saved?" Between January 2009 and September2013, 14 mass shootings took place in public spaces that were so-called "gun-free zones." In 13 mass shootings,military officers orlaw enforcement personnel were targeted, injured or killed while responding. Ryan Lott,son of Fox News commentator John Lott,was recently back from a tour in Afghanistan and stationed at Fort Hood when he heard the shooter's shots this past Wednesday from just two blocks away. "Ironically," John Lott wrote,"my son is a concealed handgun permit holder.He can carry a concealed handgun whenever he is off the Fort Hood base so that he can protect himself and others. But on the base he and his fellow soldiers are defenseless." Instead of protecting others,soldiers surrounding the murder spree can do nothing but run and hide. Schilling reported, "Soldiers began jumping over fences to escape the attacker" while sirens sounded across the post. A warning blared: "Close your windows!Seek shelter immediately!" True,there are military police guarding the entrances of posts,but like public law enforcement,they can't be in all places all the time, Lott additionally noted. And by the time they are called and respond,it's often too late. Why is it that we trust our service members to bear arms in foreign lands to protect themselves and others but we won't allow them to have concealed permits on U.S. military bases on American soil forthe purpose of protecting themselves and others?We trust them in combat but not at the coffee bar on a military base? Schilling,who joined the Army at 17 and received the exceptional designation of expert marksman three times,wrote an email the night of the second Fort Hood massacre: "I am heartbroken overthe latest mass shooting at Fort Hood.I'm saddened by the condition of ourmen and women coming home with psychological trauma,and I'm outraged that Fort Hood is a gun-free zone.I was part of the 1st Cavalry Division there several years ago,and what I wouldn't give to be on that post with a concealed firearm tonight to help stop this brutal massacre." I pray that the White House will finally learn its lessons and make sure someone is there next time to prevent any more epically senseless casualties of our combat heroes on U.S. soil.
2 days ago
Dianna Moore
Timeline Photos
BREAKING NEWS---At least two people were injured during a school shooting this afternoon at Arapahoe High School in Centennial, Colorado. After the suspected gunman opened fire, he allegedly shot himself dead. Wake-up America, stop kicking God ou Read more ...
t of our schools and start bringing Him back. Turn back to God, bring prayer back in every school across the nation! Let's see what God will do! #SHAREifYouDare #Prayer #ManUp — with Chungie Waugh and 6 others.
2 days ago
Cabeca Health Twenty-Five Medical Societies Join Androgen Study Group to Petition JAMA to Retract Misleading Testosterone Study Unprecedented action taken to combat "false information" that has "harmed public health, distorted medical science, and violated the tru Read more ...
st between medical journals and the consumer." Failure to retract amounts to "medical literature malpractice." PR Newswire The Androgen Study GroupApr 10, 2014 8:00 AM BOSTON, April 10, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- In an unprecedented action, twenty-five international medical societies have petitioned the Journal of the American Medical Association to retract the article that precipitated recent concerns regarding cardiovascular risks with testosterone therapy, citing "gross data mismanagement" rendering the study "no longer credible." Twenty-two societies have added their names since the original petition was submitted to JAMA two weeks ago. The article by Rebecca Vigen and colleagues from the University of Colorado, published in the November 13, 2013 issue of JAMA, is entitled "Association of Testosterone Therapy With Mortality, Myocardial Infarction, and Stroke in Men With Low Testosterone Levels." The results were widely reported as new evidence that testosterone therapy is associated with cardiovascular risks, resulting in a Food and Drug Administration safety bulletin issued January 31, 2014. The 25 medical societies represent US and international groups dedicated to education and research in endocrinology, men's health, andrology, and sexual medicine. These medical societies join more than 160 of the world's leading figures in urology, endocrinology, and andrology from 32 countries, from every continent except Antarctica. Individual signers include 8 emeritus professors, 9 journal editors, and 67 full professors. Societies recommending retraction are: American Society for Men's Health Brazilian Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism Canadian Men's Sexual Health Council Canadian Society for the Study of Men's Health European Society for the Study of the Aging Male European Society for Sexual Medicine Indonesian Andrologist Association International Society for Men's Health International Society for Sexual Medicine International Society for the Study of the Aging Male Italian Society of Andrology Italian Society of Andrology and Sexual Medicine Japan ASEAN Council for Men's Health and Aging Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology Latin American Society for Sexual Medicine Malaysian Men's Health Initiative Malaysian Society of Andrology and the Study of the Aging Male Men's Health Initiative of British Columbia (Canada) Middle East Society for Sexual Medicine Russian Society for Men's Health South Asian Society for Sexual Medicine Sexual Medicine Society of North America The Society for Men's Health, Singapore Society for the Study of Androgen Deficiency Society for the Study of Andrology and Sexology, Singapore Click here to see the full list. "This is the first time in history a worldwide community of distinguished researchers, scholars, and clinicians has united to demand removal of a study from the literature," stated Abraham Morgentaler, Chairman of the Androgen Study Group, which submitted the petition to JAMA. "This unprecedented action is a complete repudiation of the false information published by JAMA that has harmed public health, distorted medical science, and violated the trust between medical journals and the consumer. Although science must always be open to new information and ideas, the wholly unreliable data in this study by Vigen et al categorizes these results as misinformation. JAMA has been complicit in creating a media frenzy regarding false risks, and is directly responsible for the new wave of medical malpractice cases against physicians. For the good of consumers, physicians, and science, JAMA should retract the article before it causes even greater harm, accompanied by a letter explaining how its editorial process failed and steps taken to correct it." This article has already undergone two published corrections, and new revelations raise additional concerns. A first revision was published online November 12, 2013, six days following initial publication, due to the misleading presentation of results as raw data instead of complex, statistically derived estimates. JAMA's decision to wait two months before disclosing this was a revised version, on January 15, 2014, was an ethical breach. A second correction published March 5, 2014, revealed major errors presented in the article's text and figure. Specifically, in response to a letter questioning a group of 1132 men, the authors re-examined the data for this group and discovered the correct number of individuals should only have been 128, an 89% error rate, involving more than 1,000 individuals. The value for a second group was increased by more than 900 individuals. Astonishingly, this group included 100 women, meaning nearly 10% were the wrong gender for the study. New information raises additional questions and uncertainties regarding Figure 2 in the text, the key to their results. "People find it hard to believe that JAMA would publish a study in which the percentages of men who suffered an adverse event was lower by half in men who received testosterone than untreated men, yet results were reported as if the opposite were true, thanks to absurdly complicated statistical manipulations of the data," stated Andre Guay, MD, Clinical Professor of Endocrinology at Tufts Medical School. "Now we find out this is the gang that can't shoot straight. In my 40 years in medicine I've never before seen a paper that says, 'Here are our data, give or take a thousand individuals.' There is nothing believable in this study." The percentage of men who suffered an adverse event (heart attack, stroke, or death) based on reported numbers was 10.1% (123 events in 1223 men) in the testosterone group and 21.2% (1587 events in 7486 men) in the untreated group. Those percentages do not appear in the text of the study. "This article has caused enormous damage," stated Mohit Khera, MD, Associate Professor of Urology at Baylor Medical College. "This article created an unfounded negative perception of testosterone therapy. Physicians discontinued treatment for men who were benefitting from treatment. It harmed physician-patient relations, as patients ask why their physicians placed their health at risk. And a new field of medical malpractice has sprung up overnight, with plaintiff attorneys in the US advertising nationwide for patients who suffered a stroke or heart attack after receiving testosterone. And it's all based on pure nonsense." "JAMA has violated the public trust," concluded Dr. Morgentaler. "Its peer-review process failed. It recklessly promulgated false information that created the perception of medical risks. It withheld news that the study had been corrected, for two months, until interest had waned. It undermined the academic process by allowing the authors to avoid answering questions posed in letters. The lead author didn't even sign the response to letters. It now stands by a highly statistical study after which it has been revealed that the statistics cannot be trusted. JAMA has left itself vulnerable to criticism that it promotes sensationalism to boost revenues, or is biased against the use of testosterone therapy in men. JAMA's continued support of this discredited study, defying the worldwide community of experts, representsmedical literature malpractice. "
2 days ago
Johann P Natan Anniversary -- 20 Years Ago today 2 people that I worked with and knew very well were amongst 26 people killed in a military event overseas. They were on a peaceful mission in 2 military helicopters as part of a Humanitarian Assistance mission that Read more ...
my unit supported called Operation Provide Comfort I, II, III and Operation Northern Watch (No-Fly Zone over Iraq) This was the multinational effort that saved over 500,000 Iraqi Kurdish citizens during a major refugee crisis that began in 1991. Saddam Hussein had been using nerve gas to kill these people and doing other things to persecute them. When in upwards of a million of them fled to the north towards Turkey, NATO came to the rescue and my unit was at the front of this effort. Several hundred Kurdish people per day were dying at the height of the crisis. Our guys had to do everything from coordinate air drops of food and medicine, to digging wells, to delivering babies (some guys in my team hold records for this). We jokingly called it "Operation Provide Groceries." But, while trying to protect the Kurds, two of my team mates hit a minefield during the first part of this mission. But, the Iraqi military stayed away from us. For more than a decade after this, aerial patrols and some ground missions continued as part of a UN mandated No-Fly-Zone and Gulf War Ceasefire. On April 14, 1994, the 2 Eagle Flight UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters were visiting the Kurds not far from Zakhu, Iraq when our U.S. Air Force misidentified them as Iraqi and hostile while doing a routine mission to enforce the No-Fly Zone above the 36th Parallel (36 degrees latitude) There were no survivors. The two crash sites had pretty much nothing left. Some of my team mates who went on the rescue operation now have PTSD and other trauma due to it. I got to hear every detail. My two friends were: Ricky L. Robinson Paul N. Barclay Both were U.S. Army Special Forces soldiers and had volunteered for that mission. This was my part of the unit's third long trip over there in 3 years for the humanitarian part and 5th overall. Each unit took turns going for 3 months. We had been all over together. You get to know so much about people when you spend day in and out with them and in stressful or challenging conditions. A few months prior, we had been on ski & winter warfare training and then way up in Canada doing cold weather and other training, where Paul and Ricky were in a class that I had to give. That was the last time that I saw them. These were two of the nicest people that you could ever hope to meet. Both were also very serious about their jobs, yet more laid back and not as high strung as guys like me. (I have acquired multiple nicknames over the years due to my high energy level and being into my job) Ricky and I had served in a another Special Forces unit together and I had known him longer than anyone in the unit. He had a young step-son that he was very proud of. Everyone always stared at his tall pretty wife. Ricky always wore his wedding ring. The day that this horrible accident happened, several people came to find me. I was at another location as the unit was split in different locations as we were on the countdown for possible offensive action in Bosnia, Rwanda, and Haiti all simultaneously. I will never forget the looks on their faces as they approached me. They brought the unit Chaplain and one other person of significance. It happened in slow motion. My heart sank when they very cautiously broke the news. Then, they then asked if I might be able to identify Ricky. I remember being so numb and messed up after this that I could not get my keys in my ignition, so I walked back to my room at the barracks that night and spent all night awake praying that it wasn't true, hoping that it had been mistaken information. There are procedures in place and technologies used to prevent these types of "friendly fire" accidents. But, something went terribly wrong in the skies above mountainous northern Iraq. Coincidentally, I once flew with the crew of the giant E-3 Sentry AWACS plane that gave the authorization to shoot them down. We also all knew that the fighter pilots were all trigger happy. I also know that our military was being over extended as someone had the stupid idea to start reducing our military at the end of the Cold War. So, the news of the shootdown was beginning to hit the TV news. The government conducted a big cover up of what really happened. Ricky's wife and others fought a very public battle to get the truth. I remember seeing her being interviewed on TV and it looked like she was crying. I was part of Ricky's massive wake and funeral in Rifle, Colorado. It was a reunion of sorts. So, so, so painful that was. My former team commander came up and held me after the ceremony. Paul is in Arlington National Cemetery. Exactly 10 years later, another member of my unit, who had given the Eulogy for these men at a large memorial service, was killed in the same country and area during our second war there.(note: he is mentioned and shown at the very end of a National Geographic documentary called "Arlington Field of Honor.") Also lost at that time was Ricky and Paul's Special Forces team sergeant from back in 1994, who had gone to try to rescue them 20 years ago tonight. All 4 of these men were people that I admired and even looked up to. It took me years to realize that I had over time adopted the professional ethics of one of them. I wrote all about this event and all of this in my book manuscript, as it speaks to many issues. Many of us alumni have been in touch about this over the past 2 days. Most people don't even know about or remember these sacrifices. But, I do. So, this is an especially tough month of "anniversaries."
2 days ago
Doug Vaughan This was said by Chuck Norris and I think he's right on the money. 3Lessons Our Politicians Should Learn From Fort Hood Apr. 08, 2014 As with all Americans,my wife,Gena, and I had our hearts broken again last Wednesday as we heard about anotherkill Read more ...
ing spree at Fort Hood, Texas, in which fourpeople died and 16 more were injured at the U.S.Army's largest active-duty installation. Chelsea Schilling,WorldNetDaily's commentator editor and journalist extraordinaire,reported shortly after the tragedy:"The shooter,identified as 34-year-old Ivan Lopez,is among the dead. Lopez reportedly died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound," but only after being confronted by a courageous female military police officerin the parking lot. (Interestingly, it was also a female cop who felt responsible for thwarting the Fort Hood gunman in 2009. Nidal Malik Hasan killed 13 people -- the deadliest attack on a domestic military base in U.S. history.) Lt. Gen. Mark Milley,III Corps commander at Fort Hood, said the shooterlast week was a soldier who was under evaluation forpost-traumatic stress disorder. Tragically, Lopez tipped from one mental health extreme to the other. The New YorkTimes reported: "On March 1, the same day he purchased the .45-caliber semiautomatic pistol he used in the attack, Specialist Lopez wrote an especially angry and vaguely threatening post. 'My spiritual peace has all gone away,I am full of hate,I believe now the devil is taking me. I was robbed last night and I'm sure it was two flacos.Green light and thumbs down. It's just that easy.'" If there is confusion on a few fronts of combat,one thing is very clear:The Obama administration hasn't learned jack from the mass shooting at the Washington Navy Yard last September or the Fort Hood massacres in 2009 and last week. So let me help. First, the White House needs to pull its head out of the sands of war denial and delusion. If the 2009 Fort Hood massacre wasn't labeled by the Obama administration as "terror," we can expect it to neutralize last week's tragic shooting,as well. There's a reason formerDefense Secretary Robert Gates labeled Obama the duck-and-dodge commanderin chief in his book "Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War." Gates described Obama this way: "I thought: The president doesn't trust his commander... doesn't believe in his own strategy and doesn't consider the war to be his. For him, it's all about getting out." And a new poll from The Washington Post and the Kaiser Family Foundation reported that only 42 percent of military veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan said they believe that Obama is a "good commander in chief of the military." Forty-eight percent said he is not. In comparison,65 percent of veterans said President George W.Bush was a good commanderin chief. The president doesn't understand warorour warriors, but that shouldn't stop him from standing up for them and continually fighting fortheir welfare on and off the combat field. Second,the U.S. must do more to help treat, transition and better acclimate returning service members from the battlefieldinstead of throwing them to the lions of PTSD. USA Today just ran an article on the subject, saying: "About 1,000 veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan war era are diagnosed each week with post-traumatic stress disorderand more than 800 with depression,according to (Department of Veterans Affairs) statistics. "The Pentagon said Thursday that more than 155,000 U.S. troops have PTSD and that more than three-quarters of them are combat veterans. "The disorder is characterized by symptoms such as flashbacks,nightmares, emotional numbness orhyper-vigilance that follow a traumatic experience. The symptoms persist, becoming more severe ratherthan going away and lasting longerthan a month,said Paula Schnurr,acting executive directorat the VA's National Centerfor PTSD." Third,junk the gun-free zones on military bases. WND's Matt Barber wrote: "Notice a trend here? What do Sandy Hook Elementary,Aurora Colorado's Century 16 theatre,Columbine,Fort Hood No.1 and Fort Hood No. 2 all have in common? They're all 'gun-free zones.' "Oh,that ratherthan 'gun-free zone,' each of these terror sites had a sign reading:'Staff heavily armed and trained. Any attempts to harm those herein will be met with deadly force.' "Might some of those beautiful souls have yet died before one or more well-armed good guys could take out the well-armed bad guys?Perhaps. But how many precious lives could have been saved?" Between January 2009 and September2013, 14 mass shootings took place in public spaces that were so-called "gun-free zones." In 13 mass shootings,military officers orlaw enforcement personnel were targeted, injured or killed while responding. Ryan Lott,son of Fox News commentator John Lott,was recently back from a tour in Afghanistan and stationed at Fort Hood when he heard the shooter's shots this past Wednesday from just two blocks away. "Ironically," John Lott wrote,"my son is a concealed handgun permit holder.He can carry a concealed handgun whenever he is off the Fort Hood base so that he can protect himself and others. But on the base he and his fellow soldiers are defenseless." Instead of protecting others,soldiers surrounding the murder spree can do nothing but run and hide. Schilling reported, "Soldiers began jumping over fences to escape the attacker" while sirens sounded across the post. A warning blared: "Close your windows!Seek shelter immediately!" True,there are military police guarding the entrances of posts,but like public law enforcement,they can't be in all places all the time, Lott additionally noted. And by the time they are called and respond,it's often too late. Why is it that we trust our service members to bear arms in foreign lands to protect themselves and others but we won't allow them to have concealed permits on U.S. military bases on American soil forthe purpose of protecting themselves and others?We trust them in combat but not at the coffee bar on a military base? Schilling,who joined the Army at 17 and received the exceptional designation of expert marksman three times,wrote an email the night of the second Fort Hood massacre: "I am heartbroken overthe latest mass shooting at Fort Hood.I'm saddened by the condition of ourmen and women coming home with psychological trauma,and I'm outraged that Fort Hood is a gun-free zone.I was part of the 1st Cavalry Division there several years ago,and what I wouldn't give to be on that post with a concealed firearm tonight to help stop this brutal massacre." I pray that the White House will finally learn its lessons and make sure someone is there next time to prevent any more epically senseless casualties of our combat heroes on U.S. soil.
2 days ago
Previous page >>