Pork empanada story posts

Reynilyn
different culture of the philippines
The culture of the Philippines has been heavily influenced by both Asianand Western cultures. The Philippines was firstsettled by Melanesians;today, although few in numbers, they preserve a very traditional way of lifeand culture. After them, Read more ... the Austronesians or more specifically, Malayo-Polynesians,arrived on the islands. Today the Austronesian culture is very evident in theethnicity, language, food, dance and almost every aspect of the culture. TheseAustronesians engaged in trading with China, India, Japan, the Ryukyu Islands,the Middle East, Borneo, andother places. As a result, those cultures have also left a mark on Filipinoculture.[1][2] The Spanish colonized theislands and after more than three centuries of colonization Hispanic influencehas heavily impacted the culture. The Philippines being governed from both Mexico andSpain, had received a fair bit of Hispanic influence. Mexican and Spanishinfluence can be seen in dance and religion as well as many other aspects ofthe culture. After being colonized by Spain, the Philippines became a U.S.territory for almost 50 years. Influence from the United States is seen in thewide use of the English language, and the modern pop culture.     Religion[edit] Main articles: Religionin the Philippines and Philippine mythology The Philippines is one of two predominantly Roman Catholic nations in Asia-Pacific, the other beingEast Timor. From a census in 2012, Christianity consist about 80%[3][4]of the population. Islam is the religion for about 11%[5] of the population.Buddhism shares 1.8% of the population, while 3.8% practice other religions.The remaining 0.6 did not specify a religion while 11% are irreligious[6]according to Dentsu Communication Institute Inc. Before the arrival of the Spaniards and the introduction ofRoman Catholicism and Western culture in the 16th century, the indigenous Austronesian people of what is now called the Philippines wereadherents of a mixture of shamanistic Animism,Islam, Hinduism and Vajrayana Buddhism.[7]     Filipino arts[edit] Main article: Arts of the Philippines Arts of the Philippines cover a variety of forms ofentertainment. Folk art and ethnographic art consist of classic and modern features that flourished as aresult of European and Indigenous influences.Literature[edit] Mainarticle: Literature of the Philippines The literature of thePhilippines illustrates the Prehistory and European colonial legacy of thePhilippines, written in both Indigenous and Hispanic writing system. Most ofthe traditional literatures of the Philippines were written during the Mexicanand Spanish period. Philippine literature is written in Spanish, English, Tagalog,and/or other native Philippine languages.    Arts(Visual)    Painting[edit] A Bontoc warrior (c. 1908) showing thecharacteristic tattoos of some indigenous Filipino cultures. Early Filipino painting can befound in red slip (clay mixed with water) designs embellished on the ritualpottery of the Philippines such as the acclaimed Manunggul Jar. Evidence of Philippine pottery-makingdated as early as 6,000 BC has been found in Sanga-sanga Cave, Sulu andLaurente Cave, Cagayan. It has been proven that by 5,000 BC, the making ofpottery was practiced throughout the country. Early Filipinos started makingpottery before their Cambodian neighbors, and at about the same time as theThais as part of what appears to be a widespread Ice Age development of potterytechnology. Further evidence of painting is manifest in the tattoo tradition ofearly Filipinos, whom the Portuguese explorer referred to as Pintados or the 'Painted People' of the Visayas.[8][9] Various designs referencing flora and faunawith heavenly bodies decorate their bodies in various colored pigmentation.Perhaps, some of the most elaborate painting done by early Filipinos thatsurvive to the present day can be manifested among the arts and architecture ofthe Maranao who arewell known for the Naga Dragons and the Sarimanok carvedand painted in the beautiful Panolong of their Torogan or King's House. Filipinos began creatingpaintings in the European tradition during 17th-century Spanish period. Theearliest of these paintings were Church frescoes, religious imagery fromBiblical sources, as well as engravings, sculptures and lithographs featuringChristian icons and European nobility. Most of the paintings and sculpturesbetween the 19th and 20th centuries produced a mixture of religious, political,and landscape art works, with qualities of sweetness, dark, and light. Early modernist painters such as Damián Domingo was associated with religious and secularpaintings. The art of Juan Lunaand Félix Hidalgo showed a trend for political statement. Thefirst Philippine national artist FernandoAmorsolo usedpost-modernism to produce paintings that illustrated Philippine culture, natureand harmony. While other artist such as Fernando Zóbel used realities and abstract on his work. In the early 1980s, otherunique folk artist exist one of these is Elito Circa asamangpintor the famous Filipino folk painter. He useshis own hair to make his paintbrushes, and signs his name with his own blood onthe right side of his paintings. He developed his own styles withoutprofessional training or guidance from masters.    Indigenous art[edit] The Itneg people are known fortheir intricate woven fabrics. The binakol is a blanket which features designs thatincorporate optical illusions. Woven fabrics of the Ga'dang people usually havebright red tones. Their weaving can also be identified by beaded ornamentation.Other peoples such as the Ilongot make jewelry from pearl, red hornbill beaks,plants, and metals. The Lumad peoples of Mindanao such as the B'laan, Mandaya, Mansaka andT'boli are skilled in the art of dyeing abaca fiber. Abaca is aplant closely related to bananas, andits leaves are used to make fiber known as Manilahemp. The fiber is dyed by a method called ikat. Ikat fiber are woven into cloth with geometricpatterns depicting human, animal and plant themes.    Kut-kut art[edit] A technique combining ancientOriental and European art process. Considered lost art and highly collectibleart form. Very few known art pieces existed today. The technique was practicedby the indigenous people of Samar Island between early 1600 and late 1800 A.D. Kut-kut is an exotic Philippine art form based onearly century techniques—sgraffito, encaustic and layering. The merging ofthese ancient styles produces a unique artwork characterized by delicateswirling interwoven lines, multi-layered texture and an illusion ofthree-dimensional space.    Islamic art[edit] Islamicart in the Philippineshave two main artistic styles. One is a curved-line woodcarving and metalworking called okir,similar to the Middle Eastern Islamic art. This style is associated with men.The other style is geometric tapestries, and is associated with women. TheTausug and Sama–Bajau exhibit their okir on elaborate markings with boat-likeimagery. The Marananaos make similar carvings on housings called torogan.Weapons made by Muslim Filipinos such as the kampilanareskillfully carved.    Performing arts    Music[edit] Mainarticle: Music in the Philippines The Philippine Palabuniyan Kulintang musicians performing theKulintang instruments which is the music of the Maguindanao people. The early music of thePhilippines featured a mixture of Indigenous, Islamic and a variety of Asiansounds that flourished before the European and American colonization in the16th and 20th centuries. Spanish settlers and Filipinos played a variety ofmusical instruments, including flutes, guitar, ukelele, violin, trumpets anddrums. Theyperformed songs and dances to celebrate festive occasions. By the 21st century,many of the folk songs and dances have remained intact throughout thePhilippines. Some of the groups that perform these folk songs and dances arethe Bayanihan, Filipinescas, Barangay-Barrio, Hariraya,the Karilagan Ensemble, and groups associated with the guilds of Manila, and Fort Santiago theatres. Many Filipino musicians have risenprominence such as the composer and conductor Antonio J. Molina, thecomposer Felipe P. de Leon, knownfor his nationalistic themes and the opera singer JovitaFuentes. Modern day Philippine musicfeatures several styles. Most music genres are contemporary such as Filipinorock, Filipinohip hop andother musical styles. Some are traditional such as Filipino folk music.    Dancing[edit] Mainarticle: PhilippineDance A Zamboangueño dancein Philippine Hispanic tradition. Philippine folk dances includethe Tinikling and Cariñosa. In the southern region of Mindanao, Singkilis a popular dance showcasing the story of a prince and princess in the forest. Bamboo polesare arranged in a tic-tac-toe pattern in which the dancers exploit everyposition of these clashing poles.[10][11]      Cinema and television[edit] Mainarticle: Cinema of the Philippines The advent of the cinema of the Philippines can be traced back to the early days offilmmaking in 1897 when a Spanish theater ownerscreened imported moving pictures. Mila delSol starredin one of the earliest Filipino movies,Giliw Ko (1939), along withFernandoPoe, Sr.. The formative years ofPhilippine cinema, starting from the 1930s, were a time of discovery of film asa new medium of expressing artworks. Scripts and characterizations in filmscame from popular theater shows and Philippine literature. In the 1940s, Philippine cinemabrought the consciousness of reality in its film industry. Nationalistic filmsbecame popular, and movie themes consisting primarily of war and heroism andproved to be successful with Philippine audiences. The 1950s saw the first goldenage of Philippine cinema,[12][13] with the emergence of more artistic andmature films, and significant improvement in cinematic techniques amongfilmmakers. The studio system produced frenetic activity in the Philippine filmindustry as many films were made annually and several local talents started togain recognition abroad. Award-winning filmmakers and actors were firstintroduced during this period. As the decade drew to a close, the studio systemmonopoly came under siege as a result of labor-management conflicts. By the1960s, the artistry established in the previous years was in decline. This eracan be characterized by rampant commercialism in films. The 1970s and 1980s wereconsidered turbulent years for the Philippine film industry, bringing bothpositive and negative changes. The films in this period dealt with more serioustopics following the Martial law era. In addition, action, western, drama,adult and comedy films developed further in picture quality, sound and writing.The 1980s brought the arrival of alternative or independent cinema in thePhilippines. The 1990s saw the emergingpopularity of drama, teen-oriented romantic comedy, adult, comedy and actionfilms.[13] The Philippines, being one ofAsia's earliest film industry producers, remains undisputed in terms of thehighest level of theater admission in Asia. Over the years, however, thePhilippine film industry has registered a steady decline in movie viewershipfrom 131 million in 1996 to 63 million in 2004.[14][15] From a high production rate of 350 films ayear in the 1950s, and 200 films a year during the 1980s, the Philippine filmindustry production rate declined in 2006 to 2007.[14][15] The 21st century saw the rebirth ofindependent filmmaking through the use of digital technology and a number offilms have once again earned nationwide recognition and prestige. With the high rates of filmproduction in the past, several movie artists have appeared in over 100+ rolesin Philippine Cinema[16] and enjoyed great recognition from fans andmoviegoers.    Architecture[edit] Mainarticle: Architecture of the Philippines CalleCrisologo in Vigan, Ilocos Sur, showing a blend of Hispanic andChinese architecture The Nipa hut (BahayKubo) is the mainstream form of housing. It is characterized by use ofsimple materials such as bamboo and coconut as the main sources of wood.Cogongrass, Nipa palm leavesand coconut fronds are used as roof thatching. Most primitive homes are builton stilts due to frequent flooding during the rainy season. Regional variationsinclude the use of thicker, and denser roof thatching in mountain areas, orlonger stilts on coastal areas particularly if the structure is built overwater. The architecture of other indigenous peoples may be characterized by anangular wooden roofs, bamboo in place of leafy thatching and ornate woodencarvings. The Spaniards introduced stonesas housing and building materials. The introduction of Christianity brought European churches, and architecturewhich subsequently became the center of most towns and cities. Spanisharchitecture can be found in Intramuros, Vigan, Iloilo, Jaro andother parts of the Philippines. Islamic and other Asian architecture can alsobe seen depicted on buildings such as mosques and temples. The University of Santo TomasMain Building ( UST Main Building ), designed by Fr. Roque Ruaño, O.P., is thefirst earthquake-resistant building in the Philippines.[1] Ruaño was influencedby Frank Lloyd Wright's Imperial Hotel, Tokyo The CoconutPalace is anexample of Philippine Architecture. Contemporary architecture has adistinctively Western style although pre-Hispanic housing is still common inrural areas. American style suburban-gated communities are popular in thecities, including Manila, and the surrounding provinces.     Cuisine[edit] Main article: Philippine cuisine Filipinos cook a variety of foods influenced by Western andAsian cuisine. The Philippines is considered a melting pot of Asia. Eating out is a favorite Filipino pastime. A typical Pinoy dietconsists at most of six meals a day; breakfast, snacks, lunch, snacks, dinner,and again a midnight snack before going to sleep. Rice is a staple in the Filipino diet, and isusually eaten together with other dishes. Filipinos regularly use spoonstogether with forks and knives. Some also eat with their hands, especially ininformal settings, and when eating seafood. Rice, corn, and popular dishes such as adobo (a meat stew made from either pork or chicken), lumpia (meat or vegetable rolls), pancit (a noodle dish), and lechón (roasted pig) are servedon plates. A roasted pig known as the Lechón, one of thePhilippines most popular dishes. Other popular dishes brought from Spanish and Southeast Asian influences include afritada, asado, chorizo, empanadas, mani (roasted peanuts), paksiw (fish or pork, cookedin vinegar and water with some spices like garlic and pepper), pan de sal(bread of salt), pescado frito (fried or grilledfish), sisig, torta (omelette), kare-kare(ox-tail stew), kilawen,pinakbet (vegetable stew), pinapaitan, and sinigang (tamarindsoup with a variety of pork, fish, or prawns). Some delicacies eaten by some Filipinos mayseem unappetizing to the Western palate include balut (boiled egg with a fertilized ducklinginside), longanisa (sweet sausage), and dinuguan (soup made from pork blood). Popular snacks and desserts such as chicharon (deep fried pork orchicken skin),halo-halo (crushed ice with evaporated milk, flan, and sliced tropical fruit), puto(whiterice cakes), bibingka (rice cake with butter or margarine and salted eggs),ensaymada (sweet roll with grated cheese on top), polvoron (powder candy), and tsokolate (chocolate) are usually eaten outside the three main meals. PopularPhilippine beverages include San Miguel Beer, Tanduay Rhum, coconut arrack, andtuba. Every province has its own specialty and tastes vary in each region.In Bicol,for example, foods are generally spicier than elsewhere in the Philippines.Patis, suka, toyo, bagoong, and banana catsup are the most common condimentsfound in Filipino homes and restaurants. Western fast food chains such as McDonald's, Wendy's, KFC, and Pizza Hut are a common sight in the country.     Education[edit] Main articles: Educationin the Philippines and Highereducation in the Philippines Education in the Philippines has been influenced by Western andEastern ideology and philosophy from the United States, Spain, and itsneighbouring Asian countries. Philippine students enter public school at aboutage four, starting from nursery school up to kindergarten. At about seven yearsof age, students enter elementary school (6 to 7 years). This is followed byhigh school (5 years). Students then take the college entrance examinations(CEE), after which they enter college or university (3 to 5 years). Other typesof schools include private school, preparatory school, international school,laboratory high school, and science high school. Of these schools, privateCatholic schools are the most famous. Catholic schools are preferred in thePhilippines due to their religious beliefs. Most Catholic schools are unisex.The uniforms of Catholic schools usually have an emblem along with the schoolcolors. The school year in the Philippines starts in June and ends inMarch, with a two-month summer break from April to May, two-week semestralbreak in October and Christmas and New Year's holidays. In 2005, the Philippines spent about US$138 per pupil comparedto US$1,582 in Singapore, US$3,728 in Japan, and US$852 in Thailand.[17][18]     Sports[edit] Main article: Sports in thePhilippines A professional basketball game being played inthe country. Basketballis regarded by many Filipinos as the country's mostpopular sport. Arnis, a form of martial arts, is the nationalsport in the Philippines.[19] Among the most popular sports include basketball, boxing, football, billiards, chess, ten-pin bowling, volleyball, horseracing, and cockfighting. Dodgeball, badminton and Tennisare also popular. Filipinos have gained international success in sports. These are boxing, football,billiards, ten-pin bowling, and chess. Popular sport stars include Manny Pacquiao,Flash Elorde, and Francisco Guilledo in boxing, Paulino Alcántara in football, Carlos Loyzaga, Robert Jaworski, and Ramon Fernandez in basketball, Efren Reyes andFrancisco Bustamante in billiards, Rafael Nepomuceno in ten-pin bowling, Eugene Torre and Renato Naranja in chess, and Mark Munoz in MMA. The Palarong Pambansa, a national sports festival, has its originin an annual sporting meet of public schools that started in 1948. Privateschools and universities eventually joined the national event, which becameknown as the "Palarong Pambansa" in 1976. It serves as a national Olympic Games for students, competing at school and national level contests. The year 2002 event included football, golf, archery, badminton, baseball, chess, gymnastics, tennis, softball, swimming,table tennis, taekwondo, track and field, and volleyball.    Martial arts[edit] Mainarticle: Filipino martial arts There are several forms ofFilipino martialarts thatoriginated in the Philippines (similar to how Silat is the martial arts practiced in Asia)including Eskrima (weapon-basedfighting, also known as Arnis and in the West sometimes as Kali),Panantukan (empty-handedtechniques), and Pananjakman (theboxing component of Filipino martial arts).    Traditional Filipino games[edit] Mainarticle: List of traditional Filipinogames One Traditional Filipino gameis luksongtinik. A very popular game to Filipino children where one has to jumpover the tinik and cross to the other side unscathed.[20] Other traditional Filipino games include yo-yo, piko, patintero, bahay kubo, pusoy, and sungka. Tong-its is a popular gambling game. Individualsplay the game by trying to get rid of all the cards by choosing poker handswisely. Sungka is played on a board game using small seashells in which players try to take all shells. The winner is determined by whohas the most shells at the point when all small pits become empty.[21] Filipinos have created toys using insectssuch as tying a beetle to string, and sweeping it circular rotation to make aninteresting sound. The "Salagubang gong" is a toy described byCharles Brtjes, an American entomologist, whotraveled to Negros and discovered a toy using beetles tocreate a periodic gong effect on a kerosene can as the beetle rotates above thecontraption.[22]     Indigenous groups[edit] Main article: Indigenouspeoples of the Philippines A Negrito woman. The Indigenous peoples of the Philippines consist of a large number of Austronesian ethnic groups. Theyare the descendants of the original Austronesian inhabitants of the Philippines, that settledin the islands thousands of years ago, and in the process have retained theirIndigenous customs and traditions.[23] In 1990, more than 100 highland peoples constitutedapproximately 3% of the Philippine population. Over the centuries, the isolatedhighland peoples have retained their Indigenous cultures. The folk arts ofthese groups were, in a sense, the last remnants of Indigenous traditions thatflourished throughout the Philippines before the Islamic and Spanish contacts. The highland peoples are a primitive ethnic group like otherFilipinos, although they did not, as a group, have as much contact with theoutside world. These peoples displayed a variety of native cultural expressionsand artistic skills. They showed a high degree of creativity such as theproduction of bowls, baskets, clothing, weapons and spoons. These peoplesranged from various groups of Igorot people, a group that includes the Bontoc,Ibaloi, Ifugao, Isneg, Kalinga and Kankana-ey, who built the Rice Terraces thousands of years ago. They have also covered a wide spectrumin terms of their integration and acculturation with Christian Filipinos. OtherIndigenous peoples include the Lumad peoples of the highlands ofMindanao. These groups have remained isolated from Western and Easterninfluences.     Philippine diaspora[edit] Main article: Overseas Filipino An Overseas Filipino is a person of Filipino origin, who livesoutside of the Philippines. This term is applied to people of Filipinoancestry, who are citizens or residents of a different country. Often, theseFilipinos are referred to as Overseas Filipino Workers. There are about 11 million overseas Filipinos living worldwide,equivalent to about 11% of the total population of the Philippines.[24] Each year, thousands of Filipinos migrate to work abroad throughoverseas employment agencies and other programs. Other individuals emigrate and become permanent residents of other nations. Overseas Filipinos oftenwork as doctors, nurses, accountants, IT professionals, engineers, architects,[25] entertainers,technicians, teachers, military servicemen, students, caregivers, domestichelpers, and household maids. International employment includes an increasing number ofskilled Filipino workers taking on unskilled work overseas, resulting in whathas been referred to as brain drain, particularly in the health and educationsectors. Also, the employment can result in underemployment, for example, in cases where doctors undergo retraining tobecome nurses and other employment programs.    Celebrations[edit] Mainarticle: Public holidays in thePhilippinesRegular holidays[edit] Date (Gregorian Calendar) Filipino language English language January 1 Araw ng Bagong Taon New Year's Day March–April Mahal na Araw including Biyernes Santo andHuwebes Santo Holy Week including Good Friday and Maundy Thursday April 9 Araw ng Kagitingan Day of Valour May 1 Araw ng Gawa Labour Day June 12 Araw ng Kalayaan Independence Day August 27 Araw ng mga Bayani National Heroes' Day November 30 Araw ni Bonifacio Bonifacio Day December 24 Bisperás ng Pasko Christmas Eve December 25 Araw ng Pasko Christmas December 30 Araw ni Rizal Rizal Day Special holidays[edit] Date (Gregorian Calendar) Filipino language English language January–February Bagong Taong Pang Intsik Chinese New Year February 25 Anibersaryo ng Rebolusyon ng Lakas ng mga Tao People Power Revolution Anniversary August 21 Araw ni Ninoy Aquino Ninoy Aquino Day November 1 Araw ng mga Santo All Saints Day November 2 Araw ng mga Patay All Souls' Day December 31 Bisperás ng Bagong Taón New Year's Eve Festivals[edit] PahiyasFestival in Lucban, Quezon held every May 15. Month Festival Place January Ati-Atihan Kalibo, Aklan Sinulog Cebu Dinagyang Iloilo February Panagbenga Baguio Kaamulan Bukidnon Paraw Regatta Iloilo City and Guimaras March Pintados de Passi Passi City, Iloilo Araw ng Dabaw Davao Kariton Licab, Nueva Ecija April Moriones Marinduque Sinuam San Jose, Batangas May Magayon Albay Pahiyas Lucban, Quezon Sanduguan Calapan, Oriental Mindoro June Pintados Tacloban City July Tinalak Koronadal, South Cotabato August Kadayawan Davao Pavvu-rulun Tuguegarao City September Peñafrancia Naga, Bicol Padul-ong Borongan City, Eastern Samar Bonok-Bonok Surigao City Banigan Basey, Samar October Fiesta Pilar Zamboanga City Masskara Bacolod Buglasan     Oriental Negros November Itik Victoria, Laguna    
9 days ago
Reynilyn The culture of the Philippines has been heavily influenced by both Asianand Western cultures. The Philippines was first settled by Melanesians; today, although few in numbers, they preserve a very traditional way of life and culture. After them, the Read more ... Austronesians or more specifically, Malayo-Polynesians, arrived on the islands. Today the Austronesian culture is very evident in the ethnicity, language, food, dance and almost every aspect of the culture. These Austronesians engaged in trading with China, India, Japan, the Ryukyu Islands, the Middle East, Borneo, and other places. As a result, those cultures have also left a mark on Filipino culture.[1][2] The Spanish colonized the islands and after more than three centuries of colonization Hispanic influence has heavily impacted the culture. The Philippines being governed from both Mexico and Spain, had received a fair bit of Hispanic influence. Mexican and Spanish influence can be seen in dance and religion as well as many other aspects of the culture. After being colonized by Spain, the Philippines became a U.S. territory for almost 50 years. Influence from the United States is seen in the wide use of the English language, and the modern pop culture. Religion[edit] Main articles: Religion in the Philippines and Philippine mythology The Philippines is one of two predominantly Roman Catholic nations in Asia-Pacific, the other beingEast Timor. From a census in 2012, Christianity consist about 80%[3][4]of the population. Islam is the religion for about 11%[5] of the population. Buddhism shares 1.8% of the population, while 3.8% practice other religions. The remaining 0.6 did not specify a religion while 11% are irreligious[6]according to Dentsu Communication Institute Inc. Before the arrival of the Spaniards and the introduction of Roman Catholicism and Western culture in the 16th century, the indigenous Austronesian people of what is now called the Philippines were adherents of a mixture of shamanistic Animism,Islam, Hinduism and Vajrayana Buddhism.[7] Filipino arts[edit] Main article: Arts of the Philippines Arts of the Philippines cover a variety of forms of entertainment. Folk art and ethnographic art consist of classic and modern features that flourished as a result of European and Indigenous influences. Literature[edit] Main article: Literature of the Philippines The literature of the Philippines illustrates the Prehistory and European colonial legacy of the Philippines, written in both Indigenous and Hispanic writing system. Most of the traditional literatures of the Philippines were written during the Mexican and Spanish period. Philippine literature is written in Spanish, English, Tagalog, and/or other native Philippine languages. Arts(Visual) Painting[edit] A Bontoc warrior (c. 1908) showing the characteristic tattoos of some indigenous Filipino cultures. Early Filipino painting can be found in red slip (clay mixed with water) designs embellished on the ritual pottery of the Philippines such as the acclaimed Manunggul Jar. Evidence of Philippine pottery-making dated as early as 6,000 BC has been found in Sanga-sanga Cave, Sulu and Laurente Cave, Cagayan. It has been proven that by 5,000 BC, the making of pottery was practiced throughout the country. Early Filipinos started making pottery before their Cambodian neighbors, and at about the same time as the Thais as part of what appears to be a widespread Ice Age development of pottery technology. Further evidence of painting is manifest in the tattoo tradition of early Filipinos, whom the Portuguese explorer referred to as Pintados or the 'Painted People' of the Visayas.[8][9] Various designs referencing flora and fauna with heavenly bodies decorate their bodies in various colored pigmentation. Perhaps, some of the most elaborate painting done by early Filipinos that survive to the present day can be manifested among the arts and architecture of the Maranao who are well known for the Naga Dragons and the Sarimanok carved and painted in the beautiful Panolong of their Torogan or King's House. Filipinos began creating paintings in the European tradition during 17th-century Spanish period. The earliest of these paintings were Church frescoes, religious imagery from Biblical sources, as well as engravings, sculptures and lithographs featuring Christian icons and European nobility. Most of the paintings and sculptures between the 19th and 20th centuries produced a mixture of religious, political, and landscape art works, with qualities of sweetness, dark, and light. Early modernist painters such as Damián Domingo was associated with religious and secular paintings. The art of Juan Lunaand Félix Hidalgo showed a trend for political statement. The first Philippine national artist Fernando Amorsolo used post-modernism to produce paintings that illustrated Philippine culture, nature and harmony. While other artist such as Fernando Zóbel used realities and abstract on his work. In the early 1980s, other unique folk artist exist one of these is Elito Circa asamangpintor the famous Filipino folk painter. He uses his own hair to make his paintbrushes, and signs his name with his own blood on the right side of his paintings. He developed his own styles without professional training or guidance from masters. Indigenous art[edit] The Itneg people are known for their intricate woven fabrics. The binakol is a blanket which features designs that incorporate optical illusions. Woven fabrics of the Ga'dang people usually have bright red tones. Their weaving can also be identified by beaded ornamentation. Other peoples such as the Ilongot make jewelry from pearl, red hornbill beaks, plants, and metals. The Lumad peoples of Mindanao such as the B'laan, Mandaya, Mansaka and T'boli are skilled in the art of dyeing abaca fiber. Abaca is a plant closely related to bananas, and its leaves are used to make fiber known as Manila hemp. The fiber is dyed by a method called ikat. Ikat fiber are woven into cloth with geometric patterns depicting human, animal and plant themes. Kut-kut art[edit] A technique combining ancient Oriental and European art process. Considered lost art and highly collectible art form. Very few known art pieces existed today. The technique was practiced by the indigenous people of Samar Island between early 1600 and late 1800 A.D. Kut-kut is an exotic Philippine art form based on early century techniques—sgraffito, encaustic and layering. The merging of these ancient styles produces a unique artwork characterized by delicate swirling interwoven lines, multi-layered texture and an illusion of three-dimensional space. Islamic art[edit] Islamic art in the Philippines have two main artistic styles. One is a curved-line woodcarving and metalworking called okir, similar to the Middle Eastern Islamic art. This style is associated with men. The other style is geometric tapestries, and is associated with women. The Tausug and Sama–Bajau exhibit their okir on elaborate markings with boat-like imagery. The Marananaos make similar carvings on housings called torogan. Weapons made by Muslim Filipinos such as the kampilanare skillfully carved. Performing arts Music[edit] Main article: Music in the Philippines The Philippine Palabuniyan Kulintang musicians performing theKulintang instruments which is the music of the Maguindanao people. The early music of the Philippines featured a mixture of Indigenous, Islamic and a variety of Asian sounds that flourished before the European and American colonization in the 16th and 20th centuries. Spanish settlers and Filipinos played a variety of musical instruments, including flutes, guitar, ukelele, violin, trumpets anddrums. They performed songs and dances to celebrate festive occasions. By the 21st century, many of the folk songs and dances have remained intact throughout the Philippines. Some of the groups that perform these folk songs and dances are the Bayanihan, Filipinescas, Barangay-Barrio, Hariraya, the Karilagan Ensemble, and groups associated with the guilds of Manila, and Fort Santiago theatres. Many Filipino musicians have risen prominence such as the composer and conductor Antonio J. Molina, the composer Felipe P. de Leon, known for his nationalistic themes and the opera singer Jovita Fuentes. Modern day Philippine music features several styles. Most music genres are contemporary such as Filipino rock, Filipino hip hop and other musical styles. Some are traditional such as Filipino folk music. Dancing[edit] Main article: Philippine Dance A Zamboangueño dance in Philippine Hispanic tradition. Philippine folk dances include the Tinikling and Cariñosa. In the southern region of Mindanao, Singkil is a popular dance showcasing the story of a prince and princess in the forest. Bamboo poles are arranged in a tic-tac-toe pattern in which the dancers exploit every position of these clashing poles.[10][11] Cinema and television[edit] Main article: Cinema of the Philippines The advent of the cinema of the Philippines can be traced back to the early days offilmmaking in 1897 when a Spanish theater owner screened imported moving pictures. Mila del Sol starred in one of the earliest Filipino movies,Giliw Ko (1939), along withFernando Poe, Sr.. The formative years of Philippine cinema, starting from the 1930s, were a time of discovery of film as a new medium of expressing artworks. Scripts and characterizations in films came from popular theater shows and Philippine literature. In the 1940s, Philippine cinema brought the consciousness of reality in its film industry. Nationalistic films became popular, and movie themes consisting primarily of war and heroism and proved to be successful with Philippine audiences. The 1950s saw the first golden age of Philippine cinema,[12][13] with the emergence of more artistic and mature films, and significant improvement in cinematic techniques among filmmakers. The studio system produced frenetic activity in the Philippine film industry as many films were made annually and several local talents started to gain recognition abroad. Award-winning filmmakers and actors were first introduced during this period. As the decade drew to a close, the studio system monopoly came under siege as a result of labor-management conflicts. By the 1960s, the artistry established in the previous years was in decline. This era can be characterized by rampant commercialism in films. The 1970s and 1980s were considered turbulent years for the Philippine film industry, bringing both positive and negative changes. The films in this period dealt with more serious topics following the Martial law era. In addition, action, western, drama, adult and comedy films developed further in picture quality, sound and writing. The 1980s brought the arrival of alternative or independent cinema in the Philippines. The 1990s saw the emerging popularity of drama, teen-oriented romantic comedy, adult, comedy and action films.[13] The Philippines, being one of Asia's earliest film industry producers, remains undisputed in terms of the highest level of theater admission in Asia. Over the years, however, the Philippine film industry has registered a steady decline in movie viewership from 131 million in 1996 to 63 million in 2004.[14][15] From a high production rate of 350 films a year in the 1950s, and 200 films a year during the 1980s, the Philippine film industry production rate declined in 2006 to 2007.[14][15] The 21st century saw the rebirth of independent filmmaking through the use of digital technology and a number of films have once again earned nationwide recognition and prestige. With the high rates of film production in the past, several movie artists have appeared in over 100+ roles in Philippine Cinema[16] and enjoyed great recognition from fans and moviegoers. Architecture[edit] Main article: Architecture of the Philippines Calle Crisologo in Vigan, Ilocos Sur, showing a blend of Hispanic and Chinese architecture The Nipa hut (Bahay Kubo) is the mainstream form of housing. It is characterized by use of simple materials such as bamboo and coconut as the main sources of wood.Cogon grass, Nipa palm leaves and coconut fronds are used as roof thatching. Most primitive homes are built on stilts due to frequent flooding during the rainy season. Regional variations include the use of thicker, and denser roof thatching in mountain areas, or longer stilts on coastal areas particularly if the structure is built over water. The architecture of other indigenous peoples may be characterized by an angular wooden roofs, bamboo in place of leafy thatching and ornate wooden carvings. The Spaniards introduced stones as housing and building materials. The introduction of Christianity brought European churches, and architecture which subsequently became the center of most towns and cities. Spanish architecture can be found in Intramuros, Vigan, Iloilo, Jaro and other parts of the Philippines. Islamic and other Asian architecture can also be seen depicted on buildings such as mosques and temples. The University of Santo Tomas Main Building ( UST Main Building ), designed by Fr. Roque Ruaño, O.P., is the first earthquake-resistant building in the Philippines.[1] Ruaño was influenced by Frank Lloyd Wright's Imperial Hotel, Tokyo The Coconut Palace is an example of Philippine Architecture. Contemporary architecture has a distinctively Western style although pre-Hispanic housing is still common in rural areas. American style suburban-gated communities are popular in the cities, including Manila, and the surrounding provinces. Cuisine[edit] Main article: Philippine cuisine Filipinos cook a variety of foods influenced by Western and Asian cuisine. The Philippines is considered a melting pot of Asia. Eating out is a favorite Filipino pastime. A typical Pinoy diet consists at most of six meals a day; breakfast, snacks, lunch, snacks, dinner, and again a midnight snack before going to sleep. Rice is a staple in the Filipino diet, and is usually eaten together with other dishes. Filipinos regularly use spoons together with forks and knives. Some also eat with their hands, especially in informal settings, and when eating seafood. Rice, corn, and popular dishes such as adobo (a meat stew made from either pork or chicken), lumpia (meat or vegetable rolls), pancit (a noodle dish), and lechón (roasted pig) are served on plates. A roasted pig known as the Lechón, one of the Philippines most popular dishes. Other popular dishes brought from Spanish and Southeast Asian influences include afritada, asado, chorizo, empanadas, mani (roasted peanuts), paksiw (fish or pork, cooked in vinegar and water with some spices like garlic and pepper), pan de sal(bread of salt), pescado frito (fried or grilled fish), sisig, torta (omelette), kare-kare(ox-tail stew), kilawen, pinakbet (vegetable stew), pinapaitan, and sinigang (tamarindsoup with a variety of pork, fish, or prawns). Some delicacies eaten by some Filipinos may seem unappetizing to the Western palate include balut (boiled egg with a fertilized duckling inside), longanisa (sweet sausage), and dinuguan (soup made from pork blood). Popular snacks and desserts such as chicharon (deep fried pork or chicken skin),halo-halo (crushed ice with evaporated milk, flan, and sliced tropical fruit), puto(white rice cakes), bibingka (rice cake with butter or margarine and salted eggs),ensaymada (sweet roll with grated cheese on top), polvoron (powder candy), and tsokolate (chocolate) are usually eaten outside the three main meals. Popular Philippine beverages include San Miguel Beer, Tanduay Rhum, coconut arrack, andtuba. Every province has its own specialty and tastes vary in each region. In Bicol, for example, foods are generally spicier than elsewhere in the Philippines. Patis, suka, toyo, bagoong, and banana catsup are the most common condiments found in Filipino homes and restaurants. Western fast food chains such as McDonald's, Wendy's, KFC, and Pizza Hut are a common sight in the country. Education[edit] Main articles: Education in the Philippines and Higher education in the Philippines Education in the Philippines has been influenced by Western and Eastern ideology and philosophy from the United States, Spain, and its neighbouring Asian countries. Philippine students enter public school at about age four, starting from nursery school up to kindergarten. At about seven years of age, students enter elementary school (6 to 7 years). This is followed by high school (5 years). Students then take the college entrance examinations (CEE), after which they enter college or university (3 to 5 years). Other types of schools include private school, preparatory school, international school, laboratory high school, and science high school. Of these schools, private Catholic schools are the most famous. Catholic schools are preferred in the Philippines due to their religious beliefs. Most Catholic schools are unisex. The uniforms of Catholic schools usually have an emblem along with the school colors. The school year in the Philippines starts in June and ends in March, with a two-month summer break from April to May, two-week semestral break in October and Christmas and New Year's holidays. In 2005, the Philippines spent about US$138 per pupil compared to US$1,582 in Singapore, US$3,728 in Japan, and US$852 in Thailand.[17][18] Sports[edit] Main article: Sports in the Philippines A professional basketball game being played in the country. Basketballis regarded by many Filipinos as the country's most popular sport. Arnis, a form of martial arts, is the national sport in the Philippines.[19] Among the most popular sports include basketball, boxing, football, billiards, chess, ten-pin bowling, volleyball, horse racing, and cockfighting. Dodgeball, badminton and Tennisare also popular. Filipinos have gained international success in sports. These are boxing, football,billiards, ten-pin bowling, and chess. Popular sport stars include Manny Pacquiao,Flash Elorde, and Francisco Guilledo in boxing, Paulino Alcántara in football, Carlos Loyzaga, Robert Jaworski, and Ramon Fernandez in basketball, Efren Reyes andFrancisco Bustamante in billiards, Rafael Nepomuceno in ten-pin bowling, Eugene Torre and Renato Naranja in chess, and Mark Munoz in MMA. The Palarong Pambansa, a national sports festival, has its origin in an annual sporting meet of public schools that started in 1948. Private schools and universities eventually joined the national event, which became known as the "Palarong Pambansa" in 1976. It serves as a national Olympic Games for students, competing at school and national level contests. The year 2002 event included football, golf, archery, badminton, baseball, chess, gymnastics, tennis, softball, swimming,table tennis, taekwondo, track and field, and volleyball. Martial arts[edit] Main article: Filipino martial arts There are several forms of Filipino martial arts that originated in the Philippines (similar to how Silat is the martial arts practiced in Asia) including Eskrima (weapon-based fighting, also known as Arnis and in the West sometimes as Kali),Panantukan (empty-handed techniques), and Pananjakman (the boxing component of Filipino martial arts). Traditional Filipino games[edit] Main article: List of traditional Filipino games One Traditional Filipino game is luksong tinik. A very popular game to Filipino children where one has to jump over the tinik and cross to the other side unscathed.[20] Other traditional Filipino games include yo-yo, piko, patintero, bahay kubo, pusoy, and sungka. Tong-its is a popular gambling game. Individuals play the game by trying to get rid of all the cards by choosing poker hands wisely. Sungka is played on a board game using small sea shells in which players try to take all shells. The winner is determined by who has the most shells at the point when all small pits become empty.[21] Filipinos have created toys using insects such as tying a beetle to string, and sweeping it circular rotation to make an interesting sound. The "Salagubang gong" is a toy described by Charles Brtjes, an American entomologist, who traveled to Negros and discovered a toy using beetles to create a periodic gong effect on a kerosene can as the beetle rotates above the contraption.[22] Indigenous groups[edit] Main article: Indigenous peoples of the Philippines A Negrito woman. The Indigenous peoples of the Philippines consist of a large number of Austronesian ethnic groups. They are the descendants of the original Austronesian inhabitants of the Philippines, that settled in the islands thousands of years ago, and in the process have retained their Indigenous customs and traditions.[23] In 1990, more than 100 highland peoples constituted approximately 3% of the Philippine population. Over the centuries, the isolated highland peoples have retained their Indigenous cultures. The folk arts of these groups were, in a sense, the last remnants of Indigenous traditions that flourished throughout the Philippines before the Islamic and Spanish contacts. The highland peoples are a primitive ethnic group like other Filipinos, although they did not, as a group, have as much contact with the outside world. These peoples displayed a variety of native cultural expressions and artistic skills. They showed a high degree of creativity such as the production of bowls, baskets, clothing, weapons and spoons. These peoples ranged from various groups of Igorot people, a group that includes the Bontoc, Ibaloi, Ifugao, Isneg, Kalinga and Kankana-ey, who built the Rice Terraces thousands of years ago. They have also covered a wide spectrum in terms of their integration and acculturation with Christian Filipinos. Other Indigenous peoples include the Lumad peoples of the highlands of Mindanao. These groups have remained isolated from Western and Eastern influences. Philippine diaspora[edit] Main article: Overseas Filipino An Overseas Filipino is a person of Filipino origin, who lives outside of the Philippines. This term is applied to people of Filipino ancestry, who are citizens or residents of a different country. Often, these Filipinos are referred to as Overseas Filipino Workers. There are about 11 million overseas Filipinos living worldwide, equivalent to about 11% of the total population of the Philippines.[24] Each year, thousands of Filipinos migrate to work abroad through overseas employment agencies and other programs. Other individuals emigrate and become permanent residents of other nations. Overseas Filipinos often work as doctors, nurses, accountants, IT professionals, engineers, architects,[25] entertainers, technicians, teachers, military servicemen, students, caregivers, domestic helpers, and household maids. International employment includes an increasing number of skilled Filipino workers taking on unskilled work overseas, resulting in what has been referred to as brain drain, particularly in the health and education sectors. Also, the employment can result in underemployment, for example, in cases where doctors undergo retraining to become nurses and other employment programs. Celebrations[edit] Main article: Public holidays in the Philippines Regular holidays[edit] Date (Gregorian Calendar) Filipino language English language January 1 Araw ng Bagong Taon New Year's Day March–April Mahal na Araw including Biyernes Santo andHuwebes Santo Holy Week including Good Friday and Maundy Thursday April 9 Araw ng Kagitingan Day of Valour May 1 Araw ng Gawa Labour Day June 12 Araw ng Kalayaan Independence Day August 27 Araw ng mga Bayani National Heroes' Day November 30 Araw ni Bonifacio Bonifacio Day December 24 Bisperás ng Pasko Christmas Eve December 25 Araw ng Pasko Christmas December 30 Araw ni Rizal Rizal Day Special holidays[edit] Date (Gregorian Calendar) Filipino language English language January–February Bagong Taong Pang Intsik Chinese New Year February 25 Anibersaryo ng Rebolusyon ng Lakas ng mga Tao People Power Revolution Anniversary August 21 Araw ni Ninoy Aquino Ninoy Aquino Day November 1 Araw ng mga Santo All Saints Day November 2 Araw ng mga Patay All Souls' Day December 31 Bisperás ng Bagong Taón New Year's Eve Festivals[edit] Pahiyas Festival in Lucban, Quezon held every May 15. Month Festival Place January Ati-Atihan Kalibo, Aklan Sinulog Cebu Dinagyang Iloilo February Panagbenga Baguio Kaamulan Bukidnon Paraw Regatta Iloilo City and Guimaras March Pintados de Passi Passi City, Iloilo Araw ng Dabaw Davao Kariton Licab, Nueva Ecija April Moriones Marinduque Sinuam San Jose, Batangas May Magayon Albay Pahiyas Lucban, Quezon Sanduguan Calapan, Oriental Mindoro June Pintados Tacloban City July Tinalak Koronadal, South Cotabato August Kadayawan Davao Pavvu-rulun Tuguegarao City September Peñafrancia Naga, Bicol Padul-ong Borongan City, Eastern Samar Bonok-Bonok Surigao City Banigan Basey, Samar October Fiesta Pilar Zamboanga City Masskara Bacolod Buglasan Oriental Negros November Itik Victoria, Laguna
9 days ago
Luke Human meat sold for pork (Brazil). Nobody could tell they were eating Soylent Green for real: The OTHER pork meat. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4rRY5T6MmoA
Brazilian Cannibals Arrested For Making Empanadas With Human Meat "Full Story" Crazy
Police in Brazil say three people arrested on suspicion of murdering at least two women have confessed to acts of cannibalism. The accused, a man and two wom...
4 months ago
Eric AN EVOCATIVE SHARING ABOUT THE CHARM OF OLD SARIAYA EXISTENCE THOSE WERE THE DAYS . . . . . . . ( A February 2003 story I wrote after a September 2002 interview with our dear old neighbor and relation, the late Josefa "Tia Ipang" Emralinan Albrando Read more ... - Idea, born on March 5, 1920) Can you imagine yourself without the refrigerator?Of course you can't! Nowadays, reaching out for an ice cold drink on a hot day or storing a few day's supply of food stuff without having to worry about spoilage are just too basic and taken fro granted. To Mrs.Josefa Emralinan Albrando Vda de Idea of Quezon Avenue Ibaba however, having to live without the refrigerator is just a childhood memory away! Now almost 83, "Tia Ipang" recalls having to clean, salt and fry a peso worth per "tuhog' of fish,usually "lumahan" or "bisugo", hawked by Barrio "Talaan" vendors on the streets of prewar Sariaya every one o'clock in the afternoon.These were the wrapped in fresh banana leaves and left to hang on baskets tied to the ceiling with a rope so enterprising cats cannot get to them,an they can keep for days! Refreshing cold water can be had, care of a "Galong",an earthenware jar with a faucet,while those who have a "Nievera" or wooden ice box, the traditional forerunner of the ref, can avail themselves of delightfully cold Leche Flan, Potato salad and Buco Salad during "Punsyunan" or important occasions like the then orgy of the traditional three day town fiesta. Going to the market, then located just north of the Sariaya Public Elementary School along Gomez street meant buying beef only as pigs were then usually raised in the backyards., fed with food scraps or "Lino" and a plant with hairy stems and leaves called "Pungapong", as there aren't any commercially produced feed formulas yet. Native chickens were home raised in slotted bamboo cages called "Tangkal" under the houses, fed with corn kernels, 'Ipa" or rice bran,"Binlid" or broken rice grains and palay. As such, there was no distinction between broilers and layers... they were just chickens period! Squawking native chickens,feet tied to each other and carried upside down by barrio peddlers can be bought at P1.50 per "Inahin" or mother hen. Baige - colored native chicken eggs cost two centavos (P.02) apiece from Batangueño peddlers who come here on "Karitelas" pulled by horses. Aside from salt, black pepper, "Pakaskas" or "Sangkaka" (coarse brown sugar), "Alamang", black "Bagoong Balayan", Charcoal, "Haot"or dried fish,"Kapeng Barako" or strong native coffee, garlic, and the like,vegetables can be bought from the small market but residents preferred them very fresh from barrio peddlers who grew them themselves."Tia Ipang" remembered her widowed mother Cresencia Ocampo Emralinan - Albrando or "Inanang Sencia" buying "Kadyos" or cow pea at P5 per big basket which she painstakingly removed from the pods herself,so with the "Sibatse", either for "Nilagang Baka" or tender boiled beef during Sundays or plain "Bulanglang" with ginger and rice washing which is great with the fried fish hanging from the ceiling. Likewise, rice can be bought from the market but was usually sold by the Chinese store owners of Calle Rizal (the main street of town in the old days),together with onions, potatoes, "Refinado" or refined white sugar, fine "Bihon " rice noodles, "Meke" flour noodles, soap, kerosene, canned goods or "De Lata"and other grocery items. "Inanang Sencia" accordingly went to Barrio Pantoc and stayed there for one week at harvest time.Thereafter, everything was partitioned as the palay was placed in "Bay-ongs" and loaded on the last "Batangas Laguna Tayabas Bus Company or "LTB" trip to Sariaya town at 5 PM to be milled at Briccio de Guzman's along Mabini Street. One curious commodity then available in the market was "Tap-ong",rough-edge,stone like and very salty which was dipped in oil and lightly tap[ped on boiled rice to make it tasty. At any given meal, one "tap-ong" was enough for the whole family. Sitting on a saucewr with oil,anyone can just reach out with his "Kanin-laden" hand and tap it on the rice on his/her plate. as such,there wasn't any room for the "maselan" and the "delikado" or as we put it hereabouts, the "maaduwain" since expressions of disgust as "kadiri" or "yuccky" are yet eons away. Equally curious and tasty was a home made condiment that was used in p[lace of "toyo"or soy sauce called "Kitsyap". Brown sugar was caramelized after which "Alamang" broth and "Dahon ng Dayap" or native lemon leaves were added, then everything was brought to a boil until the caramelized sugar melted, and itis ready to use. For many, it was poured on hot boiled rice and together with the very sweet "pakaskas" was a meal unto itself. However, it was usually used for sauteing actually the secret of "Aling Petra's" one-of-a-kind and so missed afternoon "Minindal" or snack fare of "pancit bihon", that went well with with "Sinukmani" or "Biko",so with those deliciously hot "Ensimada" and "Pan de Aleman" from "Panaderia Tonyong - Pilay or Villamater's bakery. Talking about "merienda" or snack simple folks who gather firewood as well as "Palapa" and "Uyo" from coconut palm in between coconut trees for fuel used to dig for "Tugi", big potato-like wild root crops with spiny surfaces that seem to be extinct nowadays. It was either boiled or dipped in sugar or cooked sweetened in coconut milk or "Ginataan" for a very hearty snack. Coconut water vinegar or "Sukang Tabad" hereabouts was likewise available in the market but it can be made at home. Coconut water was placed in a big "palayok" or pot together with chopped pieces of sugar cane and left to ferment for three days.With the question "May asim na baga ang suka ninyo?" or "Is your vinegar acidic already?", neighborliness and the community spirit were fostered care of the fermented stuff wherein everybody can avail of the fermented vinegar, after which it will be the others turn to share their sour concoctions later on. Even oil can be produced care of resilience wherein coconut oil or "Langis" was used only either for frying or for lighting "Tinghoy" or makeshift lamps using a bottle, wick from cloth and coconut oil. On the other hand, "Mantika" or melted pork fat was in turn used for sauteing and cooking specialties like "tamales","Maruya" or rice cake,"Empanada" or meat pie, and "Kinakao", a very sinful, crunchy, ring-shaped, syrup-coated pastry. "Tia Ipang's" lined yet still beautiful face lit up with fond familiarity as she eagerly shared with me these very insightful an animated recollections which she culled from memory, one lazy late September afternoon last year .Amid the deafening din an the nauseating cloudy emissions of tricycles out to fetch noisy school children who were just too eager to go home from the nearby Sariaya East Elementary School,I could only express awe and wonder at how different things were in this place,at that very long bygone time. Life in sariaya was lived simply and unruffled, as everything seemed one in a very leisurely manner. as the classic line goes, yes indeed, those were the days . . . ..or as "Tia Ipang's" lilting tone of voice puts it . . . . . "Iyaaaaa, ay ta'mo nga naman noon!"
4 months ago
Asartehuti The Cuban Kitchen: What is Cuban cuisine? A delectable intermingling of Spanish, Portuguese, Arabian, Chinese, and African culinary traditions—a true melting pot of all the influences that combine in Cuban culture. Now, Raquel Rabade Roque gives us Read more ... the definitive book of Cuban cuisine: encyclopedic in its range, but intimate and accessible in tone with more than five hundred recipes for classic, home-style dishes—from black bean soup to pork empanadas, from ropa vieja to black beans and croquetas, from tostones to arroz con pollo, from churros to café con leche—as well as the vividly told stories behind the recipes. Based on the author’s family recipes, this is real Cuban cooking presented with today’s busy cooks in mind. Whether you are an experienced cook or a novice, a lover of Cuban cuisine or just discovering it, The Cuban Kitchen will become an essential part of your kitchen library 0375711961
The Cuban Kitchen
www.thisiskoi.com
What is Cuban cuisine? A delectable intermingling of Spanish, Portuguese, Arabian, Chinese, and African culinary traditions—a true melting pot of all the influences that combine in Cuban culture. Now, Raquel Rabade Roque gives us the definitive boo Read more ... k of Cuban cuisine: encyclopedic in its range,...
5 months ago
Asartehuti New KOI eBooks The Cuban Kitchen: What is Cuban cuisine? A delectable intermingling of Spanish, Portuguese, Arabian, Chinese, and African culinary traditions—a true melting pot of all the influences that combine in Cuban culture. Now, Raquel Rabade Read more ... Roque gives us the definitive book of Cuban cuisine: encyclopedic in its range, but intimate and accessible in tone with more than five hundred recipes for classic, home-style dishes—from black bean soup to pork empanadas, from ropa vieja to black beans and croquetas, from tostones to arroz con pollo, from churros to café con leche—as well as the vividly told stories behind the recipes. Based on the author’s family recipes, this is real Cuban cooking presented with today’s busy cooks in mind. Whether you are an experienced cook or a novice, a lover of Cuban cuisine or just discovering it, The Cuban Kitchen will become an essential part of your kitchen library 0375711961
The Cuban Kitchen
www.thisiskoi.com
What is Cuban cuisine? A delectable intermingling of Spanish, Portuguese, Arabian, Chinese, and African culinary traditions—a true melting pot of all the influences that combine in Cuban culture. Now, Raquel Rabade Roque gives us the definitive boo Read more ... k of Cuban cuisine: encyclopedic in its range,...
5 months ago
Knights New KOI eBooks The Cuban Kitchen: What is Cuban cuisine? A delectable intermingling of Spanish, Portuguese, Arabian, Chinese, and African culinary traditions—a true melting pot of all the influences that combine in Cuban culture. Now, Raquel Rabade Read more ... Roque gives us the definitive book of Cuban cuisine: encyclopedic in its range, but intimate and accessible in tone with more than five hundred recipes for classic, home-style dishes—from black bean soup to pork empanadas, from ropa vieja to black beans and croquetas, from tostones to arroz con pollo, from churros to café con leche—as well as the vividly told stories behind the recipes. Based on the author’s family recipes, this is real Cuban cooking presented with today’s busy cooks in mind. Whether you are an experienced cook or a novice, a lover of Cuban cuisine or just discovering it, The Cuban Kitchen will become an essential part of your kitchen library 0375711961
The Cuban Kitchen
www.thisiskoi.com
What is Cuban cuisine? A delectable intermingling of Spanish, Portuguese, Arabian, Chinese, and African culinary traditions—a true melting pot of all the influences that combine in Cuban culture. Now, Raquel Rabade Roque gives us the definitive boo Read more ... k of Cuban cuisine: encyclopedic in its range,...
5 months ago
Johnny One day there was a man who was walking through the forest and got lost. He wandered around for over a week, and was beginning to starve. He spotted a Bald Eagle who had just caught a fish and chased it, hoping to get it to drop the fish so he coul Read more ... d eat it. Then he saw the bird land on a tree stump not far from him, so he picked up a stone to toss at it--hoping the bird would be frightened and fly away without the fish. But, weak as he was, his aim was off and he hit the poor bird square on the head, and killing it. "Well," he thought to himself, "no sense letting it go to waste, if I leave it here it will just rot, and it could save my life if I eat it." So, he built himself a little fire--using a couple of stones- -and cooked the eagle to eat. While it was cooking a ranger stumbled upon the man, and when he saw what he was up to, he immediately arrested him--because as you know, that is quite illegal! The man told the ranger what had happened, and asked for a trial so he could explain the situation to a judge. The judge listened to the man's story and deemed him, "Not guilty, on the grounds of extenuating circumstances." The man was very grateful, and thanked the judge for his fairness. Then, the judge leaned over and quietly asked the man, "Just between you and me, what DOES a Bald Eagle taste like anyway??" The man contemplated this for a moment and then spoke, "Well, it's kind of hard to explain... but, I would say somewhere between a California Condor and a Spotted Owl." We won't be frying up any eagles today, but here are our lunch specials. Mini –Wich and Soup, Mini Smoked Chicken – (11am till 4 pm). –House smoked pulled chicken on Texas toast, topped with Gouda cheese sauce and crispy onion straws, pressed in the panini grill. Served with a cup of soup. Pulled Pork Empanadas –Smoked pulled pork, red and green peppers, onions, cheddar cheese and KC BBQ sauce stuffed into a light flakey dough and deep fried golden brown. Served with a creamy KC sauce for dipping. Chicken Cordon Bleu Wrap – Crispy chicken tenders, shaved ham, Swiss cheese Mayo, lettuce and tomato all rolled in a cheesy tortilla wrap, served with your choice of BBQ chips or fries. Burger of the Week – Bistro Burger – Angus ground beef hand pattied, seasoned and char-grilled, topped with Gouda cheese, spinach, bistro sauce and crispy onions, served with BBQ chips or fries Herb Roasted Chicken Breasts – Fresh chicken breasts seasoned with herbs and oven roasted, served with sautéed broccoli with bacon and mashed red skins.
6 months ago
Jd
Pinky Terzakos
It's that time of year again my peeps. 10 RULES FOR THANKSGIVING DINNER AT MY HOUSE 1. Don’t get in line asking questions about the food. “Who made the potato salad? Is it egg in there? Are the greens fresh? Is the meat in the greens turkey or Read more ... pork? Who made the macaroni and cheese? Who made the empanadas? What kind of pie is that? Who made it? Who made arroz con gandules? Ask one more question and I will punch you in your mouth, knocking out all your front teeth so you won’t be able to eat anything. 2. If you can’t walk or are missing any limbs, sit your ass down until someone makes your plate for you. Dinner time is not the time for you to be independent. Nibble on them pecans and walnuts to hold you over until someone makes you a plate. 3. If you have kids under the age of twelve, I will escort their little asses to the basement and bring their food down to them. They are not gonna tear my house up this year. Tell them that they are not allowed upstairs until it’s time for Uncle Butchie to start telling family stories about their mommas and papas. If they come upstairs for any reason except for that they are bleeding to death, I will tear their ass up and you better not ask why! 4. There is going to be one prayer for Thanksgiving dinner! JUST ONE! We do not care that you are thankful that your 13 year old daughter gave birth to a healthy baby or your nephew just got out of jail. The time limit for the prayer is one minute. If you are still talking after that one minute is up, you will feel something hard come across your lips and they will be swollen for approximately 20 minutes. 5. Finish everything on your plate before you go up for seconds! If you don’t, you will be asked to stay your greedy ass home next year! 6. BRING YOUR OWN TUPPERWARE!! Don’t let me catch you fixing yourself a plate in my good Tupperware knowing that I will never see it again! Furthermore, if you didn’t bring anything over, don’t let me catch you making a plate period or it will be a misunderstanding. And why are you making plates before you eat? You never bring a dish or offer a dime do you? 7. What you came with is what you should leave with!! Do not leave my house with anything that doesn’t belong to you. EVERYBODY WILL BE SUBJECTED TO A BODY SEARCH COMING AND GOING OUT OF MY DOMAIN!!! 8. Do not leave your kids so you can go hopping from house to house. This is not a DAYCARE CENTER! There will be a kid-parent roll call every ten minutes. Any parent that is not present at the time of roll call, your child will be put outside until you come and get him or her. After 24 hours, I will call CPS! 9. BOOK YOUR HOTEL ROOM BEFORE YOU COME INTO TOWN!! There will be no sleeping over at my house! You are to come and eat dinner and go home or to your hotel room. EVERYBODY GETS KICKED OUT AT 11:00 pm. You will get a 15 minute warning bell ring. 10. Last but not least! ONE PLATE PER PERSON!! This is not a soup kitchen. I am not trying to feed your family until Christmas dinner! Pa fuera cono. You will be supervised when you fix your plate. Anything over the appropriate amount will be charged to you before you leave. There will be a cash register at the door. Thanks to cousin Monchito and his greedy family, we now have a credit card machine! So VISA and MASTERCARD are now being accepted. NO FOOD STAMPS OR ACCESS CARDS YET! Lmao
10 months ago
Peet Argentina part 3 A week ago since I posted my last story of our trip..It all goes too quickly. We left Patagonia last Friday! From Sarmiento we drove to El Bolson, a long ride again. We left very early. After an hour drive through the middle of n Read more ... owhere we saw a bus that slid down the edge of the road (2meters) and fell on its side. Loads of passenger were on the road some lay in blankets. No cell phone signal…Fortunately there was a house at a few kilometers away where they could go and call for help. As far as we could see no bad injured people. We gave our water to the busdriver and since we couldn’t give any assistance we continued our trip. Realising what chances we have in life. If anything like that happens in our society, in no time assistance would have arrived… Our trip went on we had some breakfast and visited a beautiful park and lake. The weather was wonderful, I finally got some tan back on my skin. In El Bolson, we met two park rangers and had dinner with them. The next morning we visited their park and we were invited so it was for free. We walked for 2,3 hours and then left for St Carlos de Bariloche. And the scenery completely changed. Mountains, trees, snow…unbelievable! The weather was nice again and we even sat outside till very late. But that luck didn’t last. the next day we went for a ride on a highly recommended road. It started to rain once we were away for an hour or so and it continued like that all day and night long! The next morning it was greyish. Thierry was supposed to go out with a guide to picture Condors but because of the bad weather and the host not available, it got cancelled. He went for a ride and I decided to have a lazy day. Doing the laundry by just dropping it off at the reception! I visited the town’s museum. Nice but in 30 minutes it was done. So Friday morning we packed, filled up the car, and dropped it at the airport. We had not been very happy with this car, but in the end I must admit it had done his job! We arrived in BA on 4pm a Friday afternoon, so traffic was crazy like always in these big towns. The cabdriver was nice. He didn’t stop talking and we somehow understood him and made us understood as well. On our trip we had not been able to change money. The official rate for 1 € is 7 or 8$ arg. If you go to a distributor you get maximum 1000$arg and you pay 40$arg per transaction, plus the fee that your own bank counts. Argentinian guests that come to stay with us, prefer to pay by card since they are not allowed to take a lot of money outside their country. If they bring black $ arg they would loose a lot of money exchanging abroad. So they are very interested in changing money with tourists. There are streets in BA where you’re being addressed for CAMBIO… We did that and we were able to get 12£ for 1€ and no costs….. So a part of our holiday just became 35% less expensive..hihi! Later that night we discovered the Argentinian nightlife…crazy, before 2 AM nobody goes out and than all of a sudden the bars fill up…and next thing you know it is daylight and you need to get back to your hotel…and you find out that your phone got lost……Grrrrr So part of our Saturday after a few hours rest was to block my phone, go out to buy a new one and a new simcard and well we didn’t do the busride to see and get to know the city…. It wasn’t planned but it was the Buenos- Aires gaypride last Saturday, and the parade was just in the street behind our hotel! In Europe it is during the day but here the parade started at 8pm! It was a big parade with a lot of people, just like Paris or Amsterdam. You don’t expect this in a south American country and certainly not in such a very catholic country. Our friend James was invited to a party with view on the parade and he introduced us. A magnificent apartment with great hosts Sandra and Rodolpho Zagert. Rodolpho is a renowned painter in Argentina and we were very impressed by his works…It was wonderful to have been to their party, nice guests, good food an very nice wines! After the party we went out again with James and well yes daylight was switched on again once we went home. Sunday we got up at 10, packed our bags, had breakfast and picked up the new rental car a kind of Renault megane. Much more comfortable then the Chevy Corsa. And we drove a 400km to the El Palmer park. Here we did a small ride and in the 1,5 hour during sunset we saw so many adorable wildlife, beautiful birds and loads of Caybaras and a grey fox! We slept next to the park. We went out to next village for food. Nothing looked very attractive so we just decided to stop at 1place and……it was one of the nicest empanada we’ve had and the pork chops with homemade fries were just delicious! Yesterday it rained all day. We had to drive another 400km to Carlos Peligrini. The last 80km the road was announced as a dirt road. The 1st 40km it was a new constructed road, it drove too well; All of a sudden without any warning it became the dirt road and because it rained so much…the roadbecame a swamp. And only after 15m we got stuck in the mud…Thierry got out of the car and got sucked in the mud till his ankles losing his shoes! So I decided to stay in the car! But not for long…… How incredibly nice people the Argentines are, within minutes they all came to help us! They first tried to pull us out with a rope but the Argentinian Renault doesn’t have an eye to fix the rope. So in the end we pushed the car out of the mud and back on the road…. We thanked the help and made them laugh by calling ourselves stupid turistas..LOL. Rental cars are a disaster here in this country. We pay more for the most simple car for 2 weeks than for the midsize 4wheeldrive we rented 5 weeks in Costa Rica last year. For this part of the trip we planned of renting a 4wheel drive, but this was impossible! Compared to the state of most of the main roads you might expect 4wheel drives the best option… We drove back to Mercedes and decided to stay for the night in order to change our plans. We called and emailed the lodges on the site…and by accident Elsa who owns the most highly rated lodge in Carlos Pelligrini, on Tripadvisor got stranded in Mercedes as well last night. She came to visit us and told us the road would be ok today, since the sun was coming out. But there are shuttles as well to the park by 4 wheel droven cars. We decided to do that and we will leave from here around noon, for 2 days of new adventures!! love Peet
11 months ago
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